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News Flash: Fresh Produce Is Safe To Eat!!!

When I hit the supermarket these days, I’m seeing canned and frozen vegetables and fruits flying off the shelves.  All good, because they’re shelf-stable and many folks are minimizing trips anywhere, including to the supermarket.  Yet the fresh produce section, loaded with colorful, delicious fresh fruits and vegetables, isn’t feeling the love. 

That’s a problem.  There seem to be concerns about buying and eating produce these days, especially if it’s sold in bulk, since other consumers might have handled it.  

Feel Good About Eating Fresh Produce

No reason in the least to avoid eating fresh fruits and vegetables.  Yes, you need to wash it.  You’ve ALWAYS needed to wash it.  You DON’T need to wash it with anything special.  Here are 7 terrific tips, straight from the FDA website, for washing fruits and vegetables so you can eat them with confidence, :

  • Wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap before and after preparing fresh produce.
  • If damage or bruising occurs before eating or handling, cut away the damaged or bruised areas before preparing or eating.
  • Rinse produce BEFORE you peel it, so dirt and bacteria aren’t transferred from the knife onto the fruit or vegetable.
  • Gently rub produce while holding under plain running water. There’s no need to use soap or a produce wash.
  • Use a clean vegetable brush to scrub firm produce, such as melons and cucumbers.
  • Dry produce with a clean cloth or paper towel to further reduce bacteria that may be present.
  • Remove the outermost leaves of a head of lettuce or cabbage.

COVID-19 note: Your risk of getting it from food is slim to none.  Check This graphic from the University of Georgia Extension.  I love it because it tells you how you WON’T get COVID-19, and you won’t get it from food. 

Your stomach acid HATES this virus as much as you do.  It’s part of our body’s protective barrier.  Stomach acid has a very low pH (meaning it’s a strong acid) and the virus can’t survive that.  Plus, the virus needs to get to you through your respiratory tract, not your GI tract.  The tips on washing your produce however, still holds.  Consider it part of “best practices” on the home front.

 

Long before COVID-19, I wanted to be prudent and remove whatever dirt and such that might have accumulated on the skin.  In our home, we’re eating lots of root vegetables like carrots, beets, and potatoes, especially now, because that’s what’s left in the farmers’ market, and since these veggies grow in the ground, it makes sense to give them a good scrubbing.  (Note, in the photo below there’s also kohlrabi and celery root on the left and right, respectively — other root veggies definitely worth trying!) I do the same for oranges and apples, too, though.  Food safety is not just a farmer’s responsibility, it’s mine and all of ours as well. 

Biggest Pandemic: 9 Out of 10 STILL Don’t Eat Enough Fruits & Veggies!

The latest from the 2020 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee established that average COMBINED intake of fruits and vegetables is just under 2½ cups a day, and that includes 100% fruit juice.  Specifically, average consumption of fruit is 0.9 cups a day of fruit and 1.4 cups of vegetables.  This accounts for all of it – including your 100% juice and the lettuce on your sandwich.  This is about what it’s been for the past 20 years.  Not much progress.

I’m not going to bother you with the Mt. Everest of research about the bennies of eating 5 cups a day of fruits and vegetables.  Unless you’ve been licving under a rock for the past 50 or so years, you know how beneficial eating fruits and vegetables can be for your health – and your taste buds.   I’m just going to say we can do better.

Cut To The Chase Nutrition take-away: I don’t’ split hairs here.  While 2½ cups of vegetables and 1½ cups of fruit are the recommended minimums, don’t obsess.  If your consumption adds up to at least 4 cups a day, in any combo, and regardless of whether they’re fresh, canned, frozen or dried, take a bow.  Keep the juice to a max of 1 cup though, and the dried fruit to 1/4 cup or so if you’re watching calories. 

Otherwise eat up.   

Foodie Alert! Finding New Fruits & Veggies At NY Produce Show

If you want to know what brings out the “food nerd” in this registered dietitian/nutritionist, watch me at the New York Produce Show and Conference.  It’s the “trade show” for growers and distributors of all kinds of produce from all over the country and I jump for joy to attend. 

It’s all fruits and vegetables, but you get a preview of what will be happening for consumers in the months ahead, including many of the new varieties of fruits and vegetables that either haven’t hit the market yet or that are readying for national distribution.  It also give me a chance to speak with the growers themselves and learn what they’re hearing from consumers. 

A few highlights (not compensated — these thoughts are my own):

Convenience Rules 

Consumers like fruits and veggies but they don’t’ want to prep, slice, or peel it.  They want turn-key food, and produce folks realized they had to get on this bandwagon if they were going to get, and keep, people interested in buying and eating fresh produce. 

Everywhere in the exhibit halls were display cases featuring pre-cut “ingredients” like cleaned and ready-to-roast cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, chopped onions and peppers and of all manner of “stringy” veggies (think zoodles but with both winter and summer squash varieties).   

Then there were the new ready-to-eat “finger foods”, mostly cut fruits but there were some surprises.  “Watermelon stix”?  That’s right – watermelon cut in the shape and size of thick French fries!  No knives needed and ready for kids (and adults) to grab from the fridge.  I tasted them and was amazed at how crisp they were.  This owes to the value of plant breeding – new varieties are bred to lose less water when they’re cut and maintain the firmness of the flesh but still have the sweetness you’d expect from ripe watermelon..  They’ll come in both the traditional red and the newer golden varieties, both seedless.

New Varieties of Old (and not-so-old) Favorites

Koru Apples

Developed in New Zealand, grown domestically in upstate New York.  Jim Allen of New York Apple Sales explained that the Koru apple hits the trifecta – it’s good raw, cooked, or baked –yet holds its crispness without turning mushy or “floury”.

I’m a die-hard apple lover and I put this one to the test.  Jim gave me a Koru to take home and I kept it in my backpack for four days to see how it would hold up. When I bit into it I found it amazingly crisp.  A tart, yet sweet flavor with no astringency.  Thumbs up.  Bonus: the Koru has a smaller core, so you can eat more of it with less waste.

They’re available from October through March.  If you see them in your market, grab them. 

 

Honey persimmon

People have strong feelings about persimmons, especially the Hachiya persimmon, shaped like a huge acorn. It’s tricky to eat because it tastes best when it’s really soft, but some people are turned off by the almost gelatinous texture.  Eat it before then, when it’s firm, and it’ll pucker your mouth.  The Fuyu persimmon can be eaten hard, like an apple (it’s one of my favorite fruits and I’ve written about it here). 

At the show I tasted a “Honey persimmon”, a Hachiya variety from Brandt Farms in Reedley, California, that looks much like a traditional Hachiya but doesn’t require softening to eat it.  It’s absolutely delicious.  Dave Maddux of Brandt Farms described it as having a lot of mango notes with a hint of cinnamon and he was spot on.  Production was minor this year but Maddux said 2020 the honey persimmon will be busting out nationwide.  They’re a winter fruit, full of nutrients and antioxidants like potassium, vitamin C and carotene, have fiber and add some great variety to the usual winter fruits.  Don’t pass this one up.  Since they look like the regular Hachiyas, the Honeys will be bagged and labeled.

Brandt Farms also grows the Fuyu persimmon – also known as a “Sharon fruit” and – full disclosure – he gave me a bag of them.  We sliced them crosswise, thinly, spread them with goat cheese, topped with another slice, then rolled the sides in chopped almonds.  Guests at our holiday party went crazy for them.  Thanks, Dave! 

Eating the Dragon

Dragon fruit has been around for years in markets but a big push is on by growers to make them more mainstream.  Dragon fruit is related to the cactus family and the outside betrays a sweet, white flesh inside, studded with tiny seeds.  The taste and texture might remind you of a kiwi-pear hybrid.  Most common are the red ones, but now they share space with a yellow variety.  Nutritionally, it’s got game: a reasonable source of calcium, good fiber, and antioxidants (the red fruit has the same pigment that gives beets their color).  The only drawback: they’re a bit pricey.  But hey, they’re definitely worth trying.  I did, and I liked them.