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And The Survey Says: COVID-19 Changed How We See, Eat, & View Food

During “This Challenging Time” may people’s usual food concerns gave way to more immediate priorities: stocking up on staples like proteins, milk, canned goods and the like.  (Count me in – I bake our bread and I’m one of those who found it hard to find yeast and flour.)   Right after sheltering-in-place (SIP) began, our attention went towards all things comfort: in our food, our home, our down time, everything.

The International Food Information Council (IFIC) conducted their 2020 Food & Health Survey of adults, ages 18-80, in mid-April, during the pandemic.  More than 8 out of 10 of us changed how we ate and prepared food in response to COVID-19.  People under 35 made the most changes – but not all changes were good ones.

Here are other survey highlights about how we see food and health right now:

We’re eating better – or not

More than 1 in 5 say they’re eating healthier, but there’s another group, about 1 in 7, who felt they were making less healthy choices.

We’re cookin’!

About 3 in 5, were doing more cooking at home.  Not a surprise, since most restaurants were closed.  Grocery stores continued selling their prepared foods at a pretty good clip, however, so cooking at home still was still able to be avoided by some.

You can bet that people working from home and now forced to produce 3 meals a day, probably relied more on help from the prepared foods section of the supermarkets.  Supermarket sales in almost all sections of the store were way up.

Got kids?  You got snacking!

More than 3 in 5 (41%) parents with minor children were snacking more than they normally did, vs less than 3 in 10 parents with grown children.  With more kids at home all day, it figures that there will be more snacking going on, and parents serving snacks are probably more likely to join them. Even so, about 1 in 4 said they were now snacking multiple times each day.

What worries us more about food now? 

  • More than half had concerns about eating food away from home or eating food prepared outside the home. Roughly half of survey respondents were at least somewhat concerned about either eating away from home or food prepared away from home (take-out, restaurant deliveries, etc.).  This was somewhat more so for African-American and Hispanic consumers than for whites.
  • Put into simple language, people want to know if the person/persons who made this dish I brought home were careful about proper food safety when they made it.
  • “Food handling/food preparation related to risk of COVID-19” had never been asked in this annual survey, but it became the number 1 concern for consumers, knocking off the top 4 food safety concerns of 2019. On the home front, we’re also washing our fruits and vegetables more.

What worries us less?

  • Food-borne illnesses from bacteria.
  • Chemicals, carcinogens, and pesticides in food.

These were still concerns, but issues related to COVID-19 knocked them off most people’s “top concern” list.  It’s consistent with the huge increase in purchases of items like canned and frozen vegetables – foods that people know are safe and have a long shelf life.

Health vs. Weight: Which Matters to People More?

Health mattered a little more than weight but not much.  Most participants valued both equally, but women and overweight persons put slightly more priority on weight.

More “style” in our eating!

A consistent trend the past few years is following some form of eating style.  Nearly 3 in 5 persons reported trying some type of diet or eating style.  Top reason: to try and lose weight.

Top eating style for 2020?  Intermittent fasting.  It bumped last year’s “clean eating” from first place.  Keto/high fat dieting was third.

The survey offered hope, though. “Nearly 6 in 10 place more emphasis on their overall health now in comparison to how they made decisions a decade ago.”  Healthier weight will follow – another “two-fer”!

Cut-To-The-Chase Takeaway

We CAN and DO make changes to how we eat – if we’re motivated.  Let’s not lose sight of that.  Instead of our motivation coming from fear, let it be wanting to feel better. And knowing we deserve that.

News Flash: Fresh Produce Is Safe To Eat!!!

When I hit the supermarket these days, I’m seeing canned and frozen vegetables and fruits flying off the shelves.  All good, because they’re shelf-stable and many folks are minimizing trips anywhere, including to the supermarket.  Yet the fresh produce section, loaded with colorful, delicious fresh fruits and vegetables, isn’t feeling the love. 

That’s a problem.  There seem to be concerns about buying and eating produce these days, especially if it’s sold in bulk, since other consumers might have handled it.  

Feel Good About Eating Fresh Produce

No reason in the least to avoid eating fresh fruits and vegetables.  Yes, you need to wash it.  You’ve ALWAYS needed to wash it.  You DON’T need to wash it with anything special.  Here are 7 terrific tips, straight from the FDA website, for washing fruits and vegetables so you can eat them with confidence, :

  • Wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap before and after preparing fresh produce.
  • If damage or bruising occurs before eating or handling, cut away the damaged or bruised areas before preparing or eating.
  • Rinse produce BEFORE you peel it, so dirt and bacteria aren’t transferred from the knife onto the fruit or vegetable.
  • Gently rub produce while holding under plain running water. There’s no need to use soap or a produce wash.
  • Use a clean vegetable brush to scrub firm produce, such as melons and cucumbers.
  • Dry produce with a clean cloth or paper towel to further reduce bacteria that may be present.
  • Remove the outermost leaves of a head of lettuce or cabbage.

COVID-19 note: Your risk of getting it from food is slim to none.  Check This graphic from the University of Georgia Extension.  I love it because it tells you how you WON’T get COVID-19, and you won’t get it from food. 

Your stomach acid HATES this virus as much as you do.  It’s part of our body’s protective barrier.  Stomach acid has a very low pH (meaning it’s a strong acid) and the virus can’t survive that.  Plus, the virus needs to get to you through your respiratory tract, not your GI tract.  The tips on washing your produce however, still holds.  Consider it part of “best practices” on the home front.

 

Long before COVID-19, I wanted to be prudent and remove whatever dirt and such that might have accumulated on the skin.  In our home, we’re eating lots of root vegetables like carrots, beets, and potatoes, especially now, because that’s what’s left in the farmers’ market, and since these veggies grow in the ground, it makes sense to give them a good scrubbing.  (Note, in the photo below there’s also kohlrabi and celery root on the left and right, respectively — other root veggies definitely worth trying!) I do the same for oranges and apples, too, though.  Food safety is not just a farmer’s responsibility, it’s mine and all of ours as well. 

Biggest Pandemic: 9 Out of 10 STILL Don’t Eat Enough Fruits & Veggies!

The latest from the 2020 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee established that average COMBINED intake of fruits and vegetables is just under 2½ cups a day, and that includes 100% fruit juice.  Specifically, average consumption of fruit is 0.9 cups a day of fruit and 1.4 cups of vegetables.  This accounts for all of it – including your 100% juice and the lettuce on your sandwich.  This is about what it’s been for the past 20 years.  Not much progress.

I’m not going to bother you with the Mt. Everest of research about the bennies of eating 5 cups a day of fruits and vegetables.  Unless you’ve been licving under a rock for the past 50 or so years, you know how beneficial eating fruits and vegetables can be for your health – and your taste buds.   I’m just going to say we can do better.

Cut To The Chase Nutrition take-away: I don’t’ split hairs here.  While 2½ cups of vegetables and 1½ cups of fruit are the recommended minimums, don’t obsess.  If your consumption adds up to at least 4 cups a day, in any combo, and regardless of whether they’re fresh, canned, frozen or dried, take a bow.  Keep the juice to a max of 1 cup though, and the dried fruit to 1/4 cup or so if you’re watching calories. 

Otherwise eat up.   

COVID-19: 5 Steps To Make Some Lemonade Of It ALL!

Amid a pandemic like COVID-19, the hysteria seems to build and change by the hour.  Businesses are shut, so are many workplaces and offices.  Gyms, malls, anything even slightly optional, not happening.  We don’t know when things will return to normal but the world isn’t ending either.  In fact, there are some real positives for our lifestyle and our health that can come from all this disruption.

Positives?  From COVID-19?  Yes.  The disruptions are forced upon us, but everyone’s at the same place.  Let’s work it.  Here’s where I see the lemonade from “sheltering in place”:

Everyone. Slows. Down.

Less pressure to get all the errands done and on time.  Indeed, none of us can “do it all,” because so much of “it” has been cancelled!  There is also no rushed commute, no traffic snarls, no morning scramble to get kids to school, no mad dash after work to meet friends or get home to make dinner, and fewer errands to run.

Avoid Going Nuts & Enjoy The Extra Time 

It’s time to get to things you’ve been putting off – especially the “me” things that help clear our heads and bust our anxiety.  Some options to consider: 

  • Move it!   No marathons, just get out and walk.  It’s still OK, even if you’re under “shelter-in-place” orders.  You’re not under house arrest, so get on your sneakers and walk as briskly as you can, staying at least 6 feet from others.  About 100 steps a minute – done outside or inside – is considered a “brisk” pace and that’ll get you a mile for every 20 minutes of walking.  Or ride a bike, dance to a video, or do online yoga!  Exercise is well-known as a great mood lifter. It clears your head, gives you a mental boost, and makes life more manageable.  Make it part of your “me” time.  About that marathon though, check out this story of a guy in France who ran the distance of a marathon on his 23-foot balcony!
  • Give yourself a 30-minute “organizing” task. The task may take longer, but spend 30 minutes a day doing it.  That might be de-cluttering your home office desk (the bane of my existence), cleaning out a closet, gathering clothes and knick-knacks to donate, or going through the pantry to throw out expired condiments and food.  You can do it at a leisurely pace and end up with so much extra room!
  • Do fun stuff. Got a hobby you never seem to have time to do?  It’s time, and make it a priority.  Aim for an hour a day here, too.  I hope you make it a habit you’ll continue, even after this all passes.
  • Family meals are back!  Make these a priority, too, and make them last at least 30 minutes.  No technology at the table, just re-acquaint with conversation and socializing.  Some of the best memories of my childhood were sitting around the dinner table with parents and grandparents.  We’d talk about everything: the meal, friends, goals, you name it, and everyone was welcome to participate.  To me, it’s what a family meal should be, but make your own family meal style you’ll enjoy.
  • Rediscover the joy of cooking!  It’s WAY more enjoyable when you’re not pressured.  You can finally get to making those recipes you’ve collected but never got around to trying.  No cookbooks? No problem.  There are tons of great sites online.  Try www.beefitswhatsfordinner for starters.  It’s my go-to resource for all things beef, and their recipes are excellent and don’t require a degree from Le Cordon Bleu.    Check out Dr. Keith’s Pot Roast recipe.  I’d never cooked one before and adapted a NY Times recipe.  Turned out to be lean and the best pot roast I’d ever eaten!  The prep doesn’t take very long, you just have to be home for a few hours.  And since you’re home anyway, enjoy the aroma and eat the reward – and it stretches for more than one meal!