Feeding Your Immune System Takes Guts! How’s Yours?

One nutrition trend that peaked everyone’s interest in 2020 was “immune-boosting foods”. Understandable, too, with COVID-19 keeping the entire world terrified and “sheltering in place”. Outside the home, people were running scared about getting COVID from any place they went for necessities and from everything they touched.

Marketers got right on the fears, emphasizing on their products’ labels and in their ads how their food or supplement “boosted” immunity. They know fear is a great motivator, always has been.

Gut-Level Immunity

Taking good care of your immune system though, means taking care of your gut — vaccine or no vaccine.  Why? The gut, especially the colon, is the nerve center of the immune system. Indeed, 90% of our immune system is located in the gut, so taking good care of your gut also serves your immune system quite well.

The gut is loaded with bacteria though, both good and bad types. The right foods can nurture the good gut organisms and minimize the bad ones that work against us. A few definitions first:

  • PRObiotics: These are live, “good” bacteria that are already in fermented foods we eat.
  • PREbiotics: Fancy term for plant fiber. Since we can’t digest it, it passes through to our colons, where it becomes food for healthy bacteria, helping them grow and proliferate.

Examples of Probiotic Foods

  Yogurt: Look for “live & active cultures” on the label.

To “cut-to-the-chase” and get good bacteria right into your gut immediately, eat foods that already have good bacteria, the PRObiotic foods. Look for “live and active cultures: on food labels to make sure the food contains enough good bugs to actually matter. Some excellent ones:

  • Yogurt
  • Kefir
  • Kombucha
  • Tempeh (fermented soybeans and often includes some whole grains)
  • Miso – another type of fermented soybean, usually seen as a paste. Adds great flavor to soups and foods like salad dressings.
  • Kimchi (this is high in sodium, so not ideal for everyone)
  • Miso (fermented soybean paste)
  • Sauerkraut (another high-sodium choice)
  • Some cheeses – but the bacteria in cheese has to survive the aging process. Some that do: mozzarella, cheddar. Have another look at cottage cheese. It can have probiotics too, if the label says, “contains live and active cultures”.

Examples of Prebiotic Foods

These don’t have bacteria, but they have lots of good fiber to FEED the good guys in your gut and help grow more. These take the longer-term approach, but these are also foods that healthful diets need anyway, so forge ahead. Some great ones are:

  • All fruits and vegetables. Yes, all of them, so eat the ones you like, preferably one or more at each meal. Raw ones will have more fiber, but don’t obsess about this.
  • All beans – kidney beans, pink beans, the ever-loving garbanzo, and my personal favorite: elephant beans from Greece.
  • Peas and lentils. Beans are actually a vegetable, but they’re also loaded with protein and get placed into many food groups. Doesn’t matter, get some beans on most days, please.
  • Whole grain bread and cereals.
  • Brown rice, wild rice.
  • “Ancient grains” like quinoa, teff, and spelt.

Refined grains don’t have much fiber, so eat whole grains whenever you have the option. Whole grain cereal is super-easy now, as most of the “big name” cereals have at least half their grains as whole grains. Some pastas are made with partial whole grains, so they’re another source.

Can Pre- & Probiotic Foods “Boost” Your Immune System?

Yes and no. A vaccine is really the only way to truly “boost” the immune system and produce antibodies. Moreover, you don’t WANT a supercharged immune system – that results in over-recognizing substances as harmful agents when they really aren’t. It’s what happens in auto-immune disorders, where the body turns on itself, causing inflammatory responses that shouldn’t be there.

Immune SUPPORT should be the goal, and the foods listed above can help.

The Science Behind The Food: HOW Pre- and Probiotics Work

A just-published review of clinical trials of probiotics and fermented foods found that these directly influenced certain circulating immunoglobulins (Ig), especially salivary secretion of IgA, one of the blood proteins your body makes to help fight disease.

Beyond the immune system, prebiotics have been shown to have metabolic and health benefits.  This scientific review acknowledged, “The prebiotic effect has been shown to associate with modulation of biomarkers and activity(ies) of the immune system.” The authors specifically noted evidence supporting a healthy gut in modulating conditions such as type 2 diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome.

Cut To The Chase Takeaway

Evidence is building: probiotic foods and foods with prebiotic fiber have a positive influence on our health, including our immune systems.  They’re also delicious, and there are lots of options to enjoy.  

Know MSG & You’ll Never “No MSG”!

NO:TE: I’ve partnered with The Glutamate Association for many years, but this post is strictly my own – all based on science and any views are my own.

I love dispelling food myths. There’s so much “fear of food”, and how food myths get started is as varied as the myths themselves.  

No food or ingredient illustrates this better than monosodium glutamate, or MSG. Based on a physician’s single letter to the editor of a medical journal, back in 1969, noting symptoms after having eaten in a Chinese restaurant.  Of the possible causes he suggested, the only one that stuck was MSG: Chinese Restaurant Syndrome was born and went viral immediately – WAY before the internet! 

MSG had been used for decades with no reported issues, but suddenly fear of MSG dominated and all hell broke loose, launching dozens of research studies on the effects of MSG. 

Bottom line, years of clinical studies showed nothing: no connection to headaches, palpitations or any of the symptoms attributed to MSG.  A new website, knowMSG.com is loaded with the facts — and lots of delicious recipes (including for the dishes you see here), demonstrating what MSG can do to enhance the flavor of healthful food. 

MSG Is Simple: 2 Components

It’s just sodium and glutamate, and we have BOTH in our bodies at all times. Sodium is an electrolyte that’s critical for numerous body processes, including the nervous system, heart and circulatory function, every organ needs sodium. Yes, we get too much, but MSG can actually help there. Keep reading.

Glutamate, or glutamic acid, is an amino acid, one of the building blocks of protein. Glutamate is in all protein foods, but we don’t need to get it from protein because our bodies MAKE IT THEMSELVES – to the tune of about 50 grams a day. That’s why it’s not an “essential” amino acid. It’s far more than you’d ever get from eating anything with MSG.

True Or False: “Umami” = Glutamate

TRUE!  Chefs speak about “umami”, the fifth taste, and it’s what every chef wants more of in food, that intensity of flavor that makes food of all cuisines so delicious. Parmesan cheese, tomatoes, mushrooms, anchovies, seaweed, beef, even broccoli — they’re they’re all NATURALLY loaded with glutamate, giving them a savory umami taste.

It’s always been in breast milk, too.  Human breast milk has 10 times more free glutamate than cow’s milk — maybe to make it appealing to infants, so they’ll feed more readily?  

10 Reasons Why This Nutritionist Likes MSG:

  1. It’s simple, just 2 components, sodium and glutamate. 
  2. Glutamate has many roles in the body, but mostly fuels the functions of our digestive and immune systems – that’s why 95% if it is in our gut.
  3. Virtually ALL credible research shows no ill effects from MSG.
  4. Safety of MSG is backed by science, and confirmed by all global regulatory bodies. MSG is safe, period.
  5. It’s LOWER in sodium than salt! Gram-for-gram, it has 62% less sodium than sodium chloride (the familiar salt used in cooking).
  6. By swapping half a recipe’s salt for MSG, you intensify flavor BETTER but also lower the sodium. Lower sodium, but enhanced taste — I like “win-wins”.
  7. Glutamate is in many foods I don’t want to live without: parmesan cheese, tomatoes, eggplant, mushrooms, and many more. These foods are loved my many cultures for their unique flavor, and glutamate is an important part of that flavor.
  8. Nearly everyone needs to eat more vegetables.  MSG can help us get there by amping up the flavor of those veggies.  Another win-win.
  9. MSG is derived from plants, and made through fermentation – much like the process to produce beef, soy sauce or vinegar. What’s fermented? Usually starch from corn, or molasses from sugar cane or sugar beets.
  10. Glutamate = “umami”.  Umami is the 5th taste that all chefs aim for, and is a critical component of the umami taste. Research suggests having umami-rich broth before meals may even help promote healthful food choices and eating behaviors in people at risk for obesity. 

Cut to the Chase Take-Away

It’s time to swap food myths for food FACTS.  With MSG, the facts TASTE better and are better for us — there’s that win-win again!

Post-Halloween! Where to Cut Back on Sugar – And Where NOT To!

Every diet, whether faddish or sensible, recommends cutting back on sugar.  Even if your weight is fine, sugar reduction is top-of-mind when you’re talking about strategies to improve your diet and health.

The World Health Organization recommends cutting sugar to 10% of calories, but strongly encourages no more than 5%.  The 2020 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee’s recent recommendations were to keep added sugar calories to a max of 6% of total calories. 

What The Heck Does “6% Of Total Calories” Look Like? 

Using a 2000-calorie “reference diet”, which is just an average amount of calories needed by the “average person” (and that’s an average of men’s and women’s needs, so very general), it means added sugar would be limited to 6% of 2000 calories, or 120 calories a day.  Looked at in grams, it’s about 30 grams of added sugar, just a tad over one ounce!

That’s a modest amount, compared to the 93 grams – about 372 calories – that the “average” person eats each day now.  It adds up to 75 pounds of sugar in a year – more than triple what is recommended.

It’s Not All Bad

On the plus side, we’re eating less than we have in 20 years.  A recent analysis from the Pew Research Institute found that, in 1999, “each person consumed an average of 90.2 pounds of added caloric sweeteners a year,” or about 449 calories a day. 

A decline of 75 sugar calories a day is great, but we have a long way to go to meet up with current recommendations.

Where Are Our 93 Grams/day Of Sugar Coming From?

Media will have you believing that added sugar is everywhere, in our cereals, yogurt, even in condiments like ketchup and, salad dressing.  But the vast majority of our added sugar comes from 2 sources: sugary drinks, and empty-calorie sweets.  Let’s look at the data

Beverages  47%
Snacks/Sweets 31%
Grains 8%
Mixed Dishes 6%
Dairy (milk/yogurt/kefir) 4%
Condiments 2%
Vegetables 1%
Fruit Juice 1%

 

How “Empty” Is Your Diet?

Some quick math tells us that calories from beverages like soda, powdered drink mixes, fruit-flavored drinks, and sports and energy drinks along with sweets like pastries and candy add up to 78% of our added sugar calories.  These are all “empty-calories” because they deliver just calories, and few, if any, nutrients, even if they’re homemade and really taste good.  Note: 100% fruit juice has no added sugar, so isn’t included here.

We can also see that 22% of added sugar calories are coming from other foods, including dairy, grains, fruits and veggies, and mixed dishes (think a little added sugar to the sauce in the frozen lasagna, that sort of thing).

Getting Cultured & Grainy

The breakfast cereal you worry about?  The sugar in your yogurt?  The chocolate milk your kids And many of us adults) like? These are in the grains and dairy groups and here’s why probably don’t need to be concerned with the added sugar here:

  1. These foods are loaded with nutrients, and
  2. These food categories are providing only 12% of the added sugars in most diets.

That 12% is important.  It means that, of our 75 grams of daily added sugar, only 12%, or about 9 grams, is coming from those foods. 

Added Sugar: Cutting Back Is Easier Than You Think

A little more math: 22% of the 93 grams of average daily added sugar intake amounts to 21 grams/84 calories.  That’s even less than the 30 grams/120 calories recommended by the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee!

If you choose to “spend” your 120 calories of added sugar each day on foods like whole-grain sweetened cereal and/or fat-free yogurt, you won’t hear a word from this nutritionist.  Indeed, a little added sugar can help drive consumption of nutrient-rich foods.  Personally, I favor Greek yogurt because it’s higher in protein, and usually has even less added sugar.  That’s quibbling though.  The choice is yours. 

As for where to spend those leftover other 9 grams of added sugar, followers of CutToTheChaseNutrition.com know of my fondness for dark chocolate.  An ounce of 70% chocolate will have about 9 grams of added sugar.  Done. And happy!   

 

 

 

More Than Ever, We Need “Polypills” & “Activity Snacks”

Even “BC” (before COVID), much of the world was pretty sedentary, and our new “pandemic lifestyles” haven’t helped. Now a new WHO report says worldwide levels of physical activity have been flat for nearly 20 years. This varies by country, but globally about 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men, are not meeting guidelines for adequate activity.

What’s “Adequate Physical Activity”?

This is defined as 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity (think brisk walking) per week, OR 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity per week (whatever has you huffing).

The WHO report was sobering. Sedentary lifestyles may be how our lives evolved in modern-day society, but they aren’t what we are built for. Still, such physical inactivity is a big negative on our health.

The Reasons We Don’t “Exercise”

I’ve used all of these over the years, so if they sound familiar, you’re not alone:

  • Gym memberships are expensive (and possibly still closed).
  • I’m not seeing changes I expected to my body.
  • I don’t know “the right way” to exercise. I don’t have the right shoes.
  • I’m too busy and stressed out.
  • It’s too cold/hot.

Add in family responsibilities and any physical limitations and the list seems endless.

Revving Back Up: Let’s Ask A Pro

I decided to call on an internationally respected colleague, Chris Rosenbloom, nutrition professor emerita at Georgia State University, and author of Food & Fitness After 50 about ways to encourage us to be more active.
Dr. Rosenbloom knows the benefits of better fitness, but says communicating it well is key. “When we talk about ‘exercise’, some people are turned off but when put it in terms of ‘activity’, it can be more palatable.”

Rosenbloom also has the same feelings about “exercise” as everyone else. “I know for me, when I use an exercise bike in the gym I can’t wait for the timer to go off and be done with it, but when I ride my bike outside I can go forever.” Rosenbloom encourages everyone to do what they like to do. “Dancing, gardening, walking the dog, riding bikes…all of those are more fun than an hour of high intensity exercise in a gym.”

If you’re more home-based now, she advises checking into some great sites for online fitness classes. Among her favorites are FitnessBlender.com (totally free!) and, for older folks, Silver Sneakers (often free with Medicare plans).

The Value to YOU

Even a little strength training makes everyday tasks SO much easier!

 

It’s OK to make all the health benefits of activity secondary: focus on fitness that’s meaningful to you. Rosenbloom calls this “functional fitness” – having the ability to do things you like to do without being hindered by fatigue from weaker muscles. She’s encourages at least some strength training. “You can see the results very quickly…admire that bicep and it can keep you motivated to continue to lift weights!” Lugging those groceries gets easier, too.

“Sometimes it is hard to get to an exercise class, take that walk, or turn on the video,” Rosenbloom said, but keep your eye on the payoff. “I’ve never, ever said to myself, ‘Wow, I’m sorry I worked out.’” Instead, she gets a lift from a sense of accomplishment, “and that makes me feel good,” she noted.

Rosenbloom is spot-on – I’m always happier afterwards. My own motivation to be active daily is two-fold: it busts stress and really lifts my mood. If I don’t have time for the full exercise routine, then I just do what I have time for.

“Activity snacks”

Being active doesn’t have to be a huge time commitment to bring big bennies, Rosenbloom says. “Be active in 10-minute increments throughout the day.” Tied to your computer all day? She favors “activity snacks.” “Take 5 or 10 minutes every hour to do easy things like walk up and down the stairs, use therabands for bicep curls, do some walking lunges, or simply stretch in a forward fold.

I like this. It’s not just “being active” but also “less sedentary”. Doing those little things during the day also helps prevent muscle stiffness.

Taking a “Polypill”?

Yes, daily, or as often as you can.  Exercise is not only medicine, it’s a medication that has innumerable benefits, what Rosenbloom calls a “polypill”.  “It has many benefits that no prescription medicine can match,” she says, including physically, mentally, and even socially. “Activity helps in so many ways.”

This post dedicated to Diane Likas Ayoob, January 5, 1928 – September 21, 2020, who firmly believed in the polypill of physical activity.

Obese? Canadian Docs Say It’s About Health, Not The Scale

I’ve worked with so many overweight and obese adults and children whose weight was seriously impacting their health: diabetes, hypertension, back and joint pain, the works.  But not all overweight people experience these problems.   Some overweight patients have told me they’re happy with their weight and don’t feel hindered by it.   

As a health professional, I know and see the risks of having too much weight.  But what about the overweight person who has normal blood pressure and lab values, a good quality of life, generally feels good.  They ask, “do I still need to lose weight?”

Not necessarily, say the doctors of Obesity Canada.  The Canadian Adult Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), a two-year effort by the Obesity Canada and the Canadian Association of Bariatric Physicians and Surgeons, was authored by over 60 physicians.  They reviewed over 500 published studies and a formed a consensus of both clinical and scientific issues related to weight gain.

These guidelines focus on health & quality of life,                      not “ideal weight”, as goals.

Why I Like These Guidelines

They state the facts:  Obesity is a complex chronic disease that predisposes a person to many disease conditions, including:

  • Hypertension
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Gout
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Numerous cancers: colon, kidney, post-menopausal breast, esophagus

They also admit that the causes of obesity are multi-faceted, and can include genetics, individual behavior, metabolic factors, and the person’s living environment impact a person’s weight.  I’d add social factors to this as well.

BUT – and this is just as important – they emphasized that managing it is not all about the number on the scale!  It’s just as much about overall health, quality of life, and lifespan.  Bravo!

One Size Fits ONE!

These guidelines push personalized treatment.  It’s the INDIVIDUAL’s journey, not the physician’s.  Yes, the medical pieces are important.  You can’t advise which road to take if you don’t know where you are.  After that however, being effective takes more: meeting each person where they are at that point in time, how they live, and what their own goals are.  That may include not wanting intervention right then. 

All hands on deck!

These docs admit they can’t do it alone.  Obesity has many causes and therefore needs many components of treatment and a multidisciplinary approach: 

  • Medical nutrition therapy (MNT): Eureka! The physicians of Canada recognize that personalized counseling from a registered dietitian-nutritionist (RDN) is critical!  It’s evidence-based but individually focused.   
  • Exercise: 30-60 minutes of “vigorous” activity on most days. No worries here – remember everything is individualized.
  • Use all appropriate tools: medication, if needed, referrals for cognitive behavioral therapy, even psychotherapy if needed, and bariatric surgery as a last resort.

It’s “Best Weight” Not “Ideal Weight”

“Ideal weight” may be an unrealistic goal for many, especially if they’ve been overweight for years.  That’s OK.  The goal should be better HEALTH first, and whatever weight you are when you’re doing healthy behaviors – whatever weight that is. 

Silver lining: Even losing 3-5% of initial body weight reduces your health risks.  Just do what you can. 

  QUALITY of life is everything!

Cut-To-The-Chase Takeaway

These CPGs don’t give permission to disregard the pursuit of healthy behaviors and lifestyles.  They focus on YOUR best health.  That means striking that sweet spot between doing what you need to do and not leaving out what you most enjoy.  It’s not the same for everyone, so have a chat with your doctor.   The goal is better health, and better QUALITY OF LIFE.  Obsession with the scale isn’t healthy! 

COVID-19 Got You Depressed? Could Probiotics Help?

Whether COVID-19 has you sheltering-in-place, quarantining, or just frustrated by not being able to have your usual life, lots of people seem a little down in the dumps, grumpy, and yes,  even “depressed”.  The “life sucks now” feelings are real, but different from true clinical depression, which can happen for no observable reason. 

Could “Bacteria” Improve Mood?

The right kind of bacteria – probiotics – just might help truly depressed people, even those who on antidepressant medication.  This just-published study reviewed clinical research on the impact probiotic supplements had on people formally diagnosed with clinical depression.  

Probiotics are what give Greek (& regular) yogurt that tangy taste. 

Probiotics are live healthy bacteria, found in cultured foods like yogurt, kimchi, and kefir.  These are different from PRE-biotics, which are various types of dietary fiber found in fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, and beans.  Prebiotic fiber feeds the growth of probiotic bacteria in the gut.  

What The Results Showed

In the 7 studies that met the criteria for inclusion in the review, all found that probiotic supplementation “demonstrated a significant, quantitatively evident, decrease/improvement of symptoms and/or biochemically relevant measures of anxiety and/or depression for probiotic or combined prebiotic– probiotic use.”  Whether the studies used one strain of probiotics or multiple strains, the results showed improvement in reducing depression symptoms. 

Moreover, in one of the studies that also measured “quality of life”, it increased with supplementation but returned to baseline 8 weeks after the supplementation stopped.

Why Probiotics Helped

If something works, I always want to know WHY, and this paper suggests a mechanism for how probiotics might help depression.

The gut is known to be the center of our immune system, and when probiotics have been found to be useful, as they have with conditions like ulcerative colitis, it’s often because of their ability to reduce inflammation by suppressing the production of some annoying substances, called “cytokines”. 

The gut also is known to connect with the brain via the “gut-brain axis”, part of the central nervous system, so “food and mood”, or the notion that what’s happening in one’s GI tract could impact one’s emotional state has weight behind it.

The “Fine Print” 

It would be great to learn that just by having some yogurt, your mood would soar, but alas, reality must be acknowledged.  These studies looked at persons with diagnosed, measurable depression.  Those who got the probiotic supplements seemed to become less depressed, but those supplements contained higher doses of probiotics than you’d get from a cup of yogurt. 

Tempeh is made from fermented soybeans & contains lots of probiotics, plus protein & fiber!

Probiotic foods and supplements may not be useful mood-boosters if you’re just having a down day, but there are plenty of reasons to eat foods that naturally contain probiotic bacteria, like these:

  • Yogurt, including Greek yogurt
  • Kefir
  • Kombucha
  • Tempeh
  • Miso
  • Kimchi

Look for “Live and Active Cultures” on yogurt and kefir labels, to be sure they contain useful amounts of probiotics. 

“Live & active cultures” guarantees a high amount of probiotic bacteria.

These being dairy foods, they also have a whole lot of essential nutrients we need, especially calcium and potassium, to help fill gaps in most people’s diets.

The main ingredient in kimchi is cabbage, and it’s fermented soybeans in tempeh, so they both have PRE-biotic fiber, too.  Heads up, if you’re sodium-sensitive: Miso and Kimchi can be loaded with sodium.  

Is there a down side to getting probiotic bacteria?   So far, there doesn’t seem to be, especially if you get them from food.  Getting some probiotics daily though, gives you the most benefit, and the study found this as well: depression returned when the probiotics stopped. 

Even if probiotic foods don’t lift your mood, you can definitely feel good about adding some healthy foods to your eating style!

From 9 Top Nutritionists: Positive Take-Aways From COVID-19

In a very short time period, COVID-19 turned how we live upside down.  We’re suddenly living, eating, and shopping differently than perhaps ever before. Has all this impact been negative?  I spoke with 8 nationally-known registered dietitian-nutritionists to get their take on what they think are the POSITIVES that might come out of the current pandemic, what they’ve learned, and a few noted what they’d like to keep from the whole pandemic experience.

Newfound Respect for Some Pantry Standbys

Amy Myrdal Miller hopes people “appreciate the benefits of canned fruits, vegetables, and beans and frozen fruits and vegetables. For too long people have believed ‘fresh is best.’  This points out the reality that canned and frozen foods offer nutrition benefits and convenience.”  If the increased demand for canned and frozen foods is any indication, this appears to be happening.

Neva Cochran agreed, noting that consumers returned to these foods as well as beans, beef, pasta, and others, “that are often mis-characterized as not being healthy or nutritious.”  Since the onset of the pandemic, she continued, “Concerns about buying organic, meat-free, non-GMO, all-natural, no added hormones, antibiotic-free and gluten-free have taken a back seat when people are concerned that there may not be enough food.”

Gratitude was also expressed.  “I’ve never been more grateful for all these non-perishable options – and the farmers who bring them to my table,” said Nicole Rodriguez.  “Whether it’s a simple box of raisins with my daughter during ‘home school’ snack time, cottage cheese topped with a pre-portioned serving of cling peaches, or frozen berries heated up as a makeshift jam,” she said she has a deeper appreciation for fruits in all forms.  As do I, including fresh fruit!  (See my Cut-To-The-Chase Take-Away below for more!)

Isolation – The Good Part

Photo credit: Andrea Piacuadio, pexels.com

Some found appreciations that had nothing to do with food or nutrition.  Chris Mohr’s normal schedule has him on the road constantly.  Being grounded (literally!) has been an unexpectedly positive experience for him, his wife and their two daughters.  “I love the increased level of connection among us.  We’ve each grown closer because we’re not socializing, traveling for work or anything else.  And I will work really hard to keep that up once we are ‘released’ from our homes”.  Probably something we all might focus on.

Having a less structured schedule during isolation has allowed Karen Ansel some freedom.  She’s found that she can do things “at times of day that mimic my body’s natural energy flow instead of when I’m “supposed” to do them.  I’ve been spending a lot of time spinning my wheels trying to be productive at the wrong times of day.” While she realizes all this may change when isolation is relaxed, “normal” life resumes, she does want to maintain take some of this new-realization.  “I do plan to really try to follow my body’s internal energy cues as much as possible.” 

Teachable Moments

If your kids show an interest in cooking, all the at-home time is great for getting into the kitchen with them to practice.   Toby Amidor, author of numerous cookbooks, has found it’s allowed her to, “Cook with my kids in the kitchen and actually see how my girls can cook without me in the kitchen.”  She sees how much they’ve learned from their mom, adding, “Now we are focused on further developing their cooking skills into more complex dishes they want to learn to cook.”  Sounds like “teacher” and her students have both learned something.

Rosanne Rust loves that people are sharing more time with their families in general, but including in the kitchen. “Teaching the kids how to bake, or working together at home, is a win-win for both the parents and the children. Even if at times it seems stressful.”  Good point.  If you’re new to teaching your kids cooking skills, start with goof-proof, entry-level skills: boiling an egg, baking a potato, steaming a vegetable.  Baby steps here!

As a retail dietitian (as in supermarket), Leah McGrath thinks many have gained a new appreciation for how hard supermarkets and restaurants work to make sure there is food available to us.  “Perhaps we won’t forget to take a moment when we’re shopping for groceries or eating out to remember that with a kind word, a smile or, when appropriate, a generous tip.”  Active on social media (@InglesDietitian), she’s using the #QuarantineKitchen hashtag.  “I think many have surprised themselves with their culinary creativity and ingenious substitutions to make meals for themselves and their families.  Necessity is the mother of invention!”

Beyond teaching cooking skills, food has always been part of family culture, too.  Notably, our isolation has occurred during Easter and Passover periods.  Christine Rosenbloom sees this isolation as, “An opportunity for kids and families to learn to cook and bake.  Teaching kids family heritage through foods and sharing treasured recipes,” is something she recommends during all the enforced down time.

I hear that.  Growing up, we celebrated what we called “regular” Easter (the one recognized nationally) and “Greek” Easter (the Eastern Orthodox one, which usually falls on a different Sunday).  This year, I did my part by making this braided Easter bread, like my Greek grandmother made, pictured here. (I hope she’s lenient – I reduced the amount of anise seeds by half and added some nuts – personal preference!)   

Cut -To-The-Chase Take-Away:

I join my colleagues in valuing all those pantry staples people have forgotten or dismissed.  They are – and always were – safe and nutritious to eat.  BUT…SO IS FRESH PRODUCE! 

Moreover, farmers need your help!  Many are plowing under or discarding perfectly good crops because of lower demand by consumers too afraid to handle and purchase fresh fruits and vegetables. 

You CANNOT get COVID-19 from food.  Why?  I explain it to you backed by facts!) in a previous post here.  So, when you do shop, buy fresh, too.  Remember – farmers aren’t “first responders”, they’re CONSTANT responders, through all.

News Flash: Fresh Produce Is Safe To Eat!!!

When I hit the supermarket these days, I’m seeing canned and frozen vegetables and fruits flying off the shelves.  All good, because they’re shelf-stable and many folks are minimizing trips anywhere, including to the supermarket.  Yet the fresh produce section, loaded with colorful, delicious fresh fruits and vegetables, isn’t feeling the love. 

That’s a problem.  There seem to be concerns about buying and eating produce these days, especially if it’s sold in bulk, since other consumers might have handled it.  

Feel Good About Eating Fresh Produce

No reason in the least to avoid eating fresh fruits and vegetables.  Yes, you need to wash it.  You’ve ALWAYS needed to wash it.  You DON’T need to wash it with anything special.  Here are 7 terrific tips, straight from the FDA website, for washing fruits and vegetables so you can eat them with confidence, :

  • Wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap before and after preparing fresh produce.
  • If damage or bruising occurs before eating or handling, cut away the damaged or bruised areas before preparing or eating.
  • Rinse produce BEFORE you peel it, so dirt and bacteria aren’t transferred from the knife onto the fruit or vegetable.
  • Gently rub produce while holding under plain running water. There’s no need to use soap or a produce wash.
  • Use a clean vegetable brush to scrub firm produce, such as melons and cucumbers.
  • Dry produce with a clean cloth or paper towel to further reduce bacteria that may be present.
  • Remove the outermost leaves of a head of lettuce or cabbage.

COVID-19 note: Your risk of getting it from food is slim to none.  Check This graphic from the University of Georgia Extension.  I love it because it tells you how you WON’T get COVID-19, and you won’t get it from food. 

Your stomach acid HATES this virus as much as you do.  It’s part of our body’s protective barrier.  Stomach acid has a very low pH (meaning it’s a strong acid) and the virus can’t survive that.  Plus, the virus needs to get to you through your respiratory tract, not your GI tract.  The tips on washing your produce however, still holds.  Consider it part of “best practices” on the home front.

 

Long before COVID-19, I wanted to be prudent and remove whatever dirt and such that might have accumulated on the skin.  In our home, we’re eating lots of root vegetables like carrots, beets, and potatoes, especially now, because that’s what’s left in the farmers’ market, and since these veggies grow in the ground, it makes sense to give them a good scrubbing.  (Note, in the photo below there’s also kohlrabi and celery root on the left and right, respectively — other root veggies definitely worth trying!) I do the same for oranges and apples, too, though.  Food safety is not just a farmer’s responsibility, it’s mine and all of ours as well. 

Biggest Pandemic: 9 Out of 10 STILL Don’t Eat Enough Fruits & Veggies!

The latest from the 2020 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee established that average COMBINED intake of fruits and vegetables is just under 2½ cups a day, and that includes 100% fruit juice.  Specifically, average consumption of fruit is 0.9 cups a day of fruit and 1.4 cups of vegetables.  This accounts for all of it – including your 100% juice and the lettuce on your sandwich.  This is about what it’s been for the past 20 years.  Not much progress.

I’m not going to bother you with the Mt. Everest of research about the bennies of eating 5 cups a day of fruits and vegetables.  Unless you’ve been licving under a rock for the past 50 or so years, you know how beneficial eating fruits and vegetables can be for your health – and your taste buds.   I’m just going to say we can do better.

Cut To The Chase Nutrition take-away: I don’t’ split hairs here.  While 2½ cups of vegetables and 1½ cups of fruit are the recommended minimums, don’t obsess.  If your consumption adds up to at least 4 cups a day, in any combo, and regardless of whether they’re fresh, canned, frozen or dried, take a bow.  Keep the juice to a max of 1 cup though, and the dried fruit to 1/4 cup or so if you’re watching calories. 

Otherwise eat up.   

7 Nutrition Myths These Dietitians Are Busting

When people learn I’m a registered dietitian/nutritionist (RDN), they almost immediately start venting their frustrations about food issues. “Every day it’s another thing you can’t do or eat.  One day a food is good for you, the next day it’s bad for you.”  Since confused consumers make no changes, I always try to bust their myths and misinformation.

While consumers may be confused about food fads, RDNs are not.  They’re fed up with them.  They’re trained to spot hype, fads, and myths around a blind corner and it annoys them to no end. I asked some RDNs who have particularly good communications skills to tell me which popular nutrition fads really grind at them.  Here’s what they said:

Carbo-phobia!

Mindy Hermann, MBA, RDN, said straight up, “I wish people would stop thinking carbs are the devil.”  She’s had it with a near universal demonizing of these essential macros. 

Sure, most people eat too much added sugar, but she’s right that all carbs seem to be lumped together, whether it’s whole wheat bread or soda.  “Today it’s keto, yesterday it was Paleo, so many others before,” she said.  “I’m tired of all the iterations of high-protein, restricted carbs.”

Plant “Milk” Deserves No Halo

Nutritionally, plant-based diary alternatives just can’t hold a candle to the nutrition in real milk, according to Salge Blake, EdD, RDN, FADN, professor of nutrition at Boston University and the host of the hit health and wellness podcast, SpotOn! In addition to being a dynamite protein source, “Cow’s milk is chock full of vitamin D, calcium, and potassium, three nutrients that many Americans are falling short of in their diets.”  Dairy alternatives only have these nutrients if they’re added, and they often aren’t.  Unfortunately, says Salge Blake, “plant-based milks may also contain added sugars, adding calories and no additional nutrition to your glass.” 

Salge Blake also sees the affordability of real milk as a win-win.  “When it comes to your wallet, plant-based milks can be at least twice the price of cow’s milk.  For the nutrients and the money per gulp, you can’t beat low fat or skim dairy milk.”  If you’re allergic or vegan, soy is the closest alternative.  Be prepared to pay though.

Stop Kicking The Canned Foods!

Shari Steinbach, MS, RDN, spent years working directly with consumers as a retail dietitian in supermarkets, is fed up with canned foods getting dissed when they offer so many advantages:

  • Sustainability: “90% of cans are recycled and they can be recycled indefinitely.” Linings are safe, with 90% containing none of the controversial BPA.
  • Convenience: They have a long shelf life and that helps prevent wasted food and wasted food dollars.
  • Nutrition: “You can cut 40% of the sodium in canned beans and veggies just by rinsing and draining them,” Steinbach says. Since 9 in 10 people don’t eat enough vegetables, “Canned beans and tomatoes count,” towards scoring enough of this critical food group, and are a, “convenient, nutritious way to balance your diet.”

Want her recipe for quick, veggie-loaded, chili using canned ingredients?  “Here’s a favorite simple chili recipe that I made this week”:

  1. Brown 1 pound of lean ground beef;
  2. Drain and add 2 cans of chili-seasoned beans and 2 cans of undrained diced tomatoes.
  3. Season to taste with cumin or chili powder. “Serve with a green salad and whole grain crackers. Enjoy!”

Don’t Panic If It’s Not Organic

That’s advice from Leslie Bonci, MS, RDN Owner of Active Eating Advice, who is fed up with food elitism.  I see her point.  I spent decades working with low-income families who will never be able to afford organic food.  They shouldn’t worry.  They can still put delicious, nutritious food on the table. 

“What do we even mean when we say clean?” Bonci says, because “clean eating” has no definition.  That leaves every definition up to whomever is spewing it and that’s a perfect recipe for consumer confusion, fear, and doubt.  Instead, Bonci favors creating “an enabled table where foods of all price points have a place.”

White Foods Are Bright Foods!

Liz Ward, MS, RDN, Author of Better is the New Perfect is bugged by all the attention given to putting “only the most colorful fruits and vegetables on your plate.”  Forget colors, she says.  “Instead of worrying about what types of produce are “best,” simply include the types you like, no matter how pale,” Ward advises.  Besides, white, brown, and tan produce, such as mushrooms, cauliflower, potatoes, and bananas, are just as worthy as their brighter counterparts,” are loaded with nutrition.

“And while we’re at it, can we stop shaming starchy vegetables, such as corn, potatoes and peas? They are packed with nutrition and starch is a form of energy.”  It’s true, these foods are hugely important to so many food cultures and have sustained people for thousands of years.  Empty calories they most certainly are not. 

One Diet DOESN’T For Everyone?  Seriously?

“The nutrition belief that I hope goes to its final resting place in 2020 is that a single diet plan, or way of eating, is right for everyone,” declares food anthropologist and nutrition communications consultant Robyn Flipse, MS, MA, RDN.  Looking ahead, Flipse feels personalized nutrition, not fad dieting, holds the most promise in the years ahead.  

Leah McGrath, MS, RDN, corporate dietitian for Ingles Supermarkets, couldn’t agree more.  “It seems like every year we have a new ‘hot’ diet,” she says.  “However, just like our fingerprints,  we should want to and  deserve to individualize our eating plans.” 

Flipse continued, “The one thing we’ve learned from the decades of fad diet trends we’ve endured is that none of them have delivered on what they promised because they have all overlooked our metabolic differences.”  They also tend to be extreme, which is probably why people burn out on them. 

Flipse admits that we still lack the scientific tools to allow us to tailor nutrition to each person’s needs.  Unfortunately, when consumer demand gets ahead of the science, charlatans see an opportunity to market all kinds of pseudo-scientific gimmicks.

Plant-Based Doesn’t Mean Plants-ONLY

This one is mine.  I’ve written about it before and everyone in 2019 seemed to be jumping on this bandwagon.  Thing is, there’s no universal definition of “plant-based!” 

What it DOESN’T mean is vegan.  Eating a plant-based diet doesn’t automatically guarantee your diet is balanced or healthful, either.  Living on soda and chips is a fully “plant-based”, vegan diet.  And it ain’t balanced.  A huge salad with 10 different veggies, some nuts, and crumbled feta or parmesan cheese or a couple of ounces of beef or salmon is not vegan – but it IS plant-based.  Flipse put it best, “I tell people if 50% or more of what they eat is plants, then they have a ‘plant-based’ diet.”

Holidays, Eating, & Why Everyone Needs This “Drug”!

NO ONE wants to hear about health stuff this month.  Save that for January!  We want our “once-a-year-foods”, so stay out of the way or we’ll squash you like a grape!  And why not?  Food that’s around once a year should be eaten and enjoyed.  I’ll even join you.

But holidays can be challenging.  There are always more things to do than time in which to do them: buying gifts, heading to social occasions, hosting them, cooking foods you have only once a year (how did I cook that last year?), and on.  All on top of the usual stuff called “life.” 

Your “Dream Drug”

If you could invent a drug for this time of year, you’d probably want it to:

  • Burn excess calories
  • Act like a statin to lower your cholesterol
  • Improve your heart’s health
  • Lower your fasting blood glucose
  • Help you cut stress
  • Give you a “mood lift”
  • Improve your sleep
  • Add some lean muscle
  • Help you think more clearly

If you could patent this drug and market it, you’d be richer than Jeff Bezos, who would be begging you to sell it on Amazon.

This “drug” isn’t in a bottle.  It’s in your shoes: physical activity.  It does ALL the things listed above and you can get all those benefits.

Registered dietitian nutritionist, Leslie Bonci, should know, as the owner/founder of www.activeeatingadvice.com, she says, “Exercise is the gift that gives your body the lift it needs during the holidays.”  This isn’t just an opinion, either.  Read on.

Hot Off the Research Press: Thinking Won’t Help You Exercise, But Exercise Helps You Think

This study, just out, looked at the cognitive outcomes of four older adult groups: those who did moderate physical activity three days a week (walking or biking), ate a DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), those who did both and a control group that received only dietary education.

Best neurocognitive improvement at 1 year?  The group that did BOTH aerobic activity and the DASH eating style.  Second best was the aerobics-only group.  No surprise to Bonci.  “Getting moving helps to circulate blood to the brain,” she says.  

Why I Love This Study

  • The participants were at least 55 years old. If these folks can do it, it can be done by most people. 
  • The activity wasn’t extreme. No marathons, no sweating until exhaustion, just walking or stationary biking for 35 minutes, thrice weekly. Just move, then move on. 
  • DASH eating style? Also easy-peasy: It’s 2½ cups of fruits and veggies and two servings of dairy foods – what we should be doing anyway!   

Starting Moving

Baby steps here.  Registered dietitian Liz Ward’s philosophy says it all. “My mantra is that any movement is better than none to relieve tension and help you sleep better.”  Even her website is called “BetterIsTheNewPerfect

No time to do that walk?  Try doing it for half your lunch hour, so it doesn’t use any valuable “off” time.  FYI: a “brisk walk” is about 100 steps a minute.

This time of year, Ward admits her workouts may be shorter or even less frequent, but she knows the benefits go way beyond calorie-burning.  “I try to exercise as much as my schedule allows because physical activity is a huge stress-buster for me.”

Start “DASH-ing” 

Getting those 2½ cups (total) of fruits and veggies and two servings of dairy is easier than you think.  No specific fruits or vegetables here, and it’s cooked or raw, so choices are up to you.  For dairy, even some cheese is fine (an ounce per serving), but mix it up.  Examples:

  • Dairy: a cup of REAL milk on your cereal
  • Greek yogurt at breakfast, lunch, or for a snack or even dessert (with some of that fruit!).
  • Fill a pint plastic container (the kind that holds the won-ton soup form Chinese take-out) with any combo of fruits and veggies – that’s 4 servings right there – so you’re almost done for the day.

Cut to the Chase Bonus: Start now and you’re (literally) miles ahead of everyone else come New Years!