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15 Tips: Prevent G.E.R.D. From Being “Thanksgiving’s Revenge”

“National G.E.R.D. Awareness Week” is November 18-24 this year — a week BEFORE Thanksgiving, but maybe that’s good.  Being aware of this annoying condition can help you avoid it.

What’s “GERD”? It stands for “gastro-esophageal reflux disease”.  Back in the day, it was commonly known as “heartburn.”   It happens when the acid from your stomach backs up into your esophagus and it burns the hell out of it.  Your stomach is well-equipped to handle the stomach acids it produces to aid digestion, but the esophagus is much more sensitive.  When stomach acid gurgles up into the esophagus, it’s painful. 

A big Thanksgiving meal can trigger GERD even if you rarely experience heartburn.  Why?  Your stomach is only so big.  When you eat more than the stomach can handle, the sphincter muscle between the stomach and the esophagus may not close completely (see the graphic).  When stomach acid is released to start digestion in the stomach, some of that acid bubbles up and you feel a burning sensation. 

How to prevent GERD and Enjoy Your Thanksgiving Meal

The International Foundation for Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD) put out this great graphic with 15 tips for avoiding GERD.  I’ll explain each one:

  1. Eat the meal earlier. It gives you more time to digest your food.  Having a big dinner in the the evening is a sure-fire way to get heartburn. 
  2. Serve (and eat) light appetizers. The Thanksgiving meal is an important tradition.  Save valuable tummy space and spend calories on the meal, instead of on typical nibbles.  A couple of bites of something and leave it at that.
  3. Stay active! Keeping moving helps your stomach empty itself a little sooner.  No marathons or vigorous exercise here, but any movement more than sitting down is a good idea.
  4. Don’t smoke. Add “heartburn irritant” to the list of reasons to avoid smoking.  Enough said.
  5. Nix the juice. The acid in fruit juice is much tamer than stomach acid, but can still bother the esophagus. Fruit nectar fares better, but if you must have juice, dilute it at least 1:1 with water.
  6. Limit the drinks. Alcohol is a known trigger for reflux.  It relaxes the esophageal sphincter, allowing stomach contents to back its way into the esophagus, but it can aggravate tender tissue on the way down, too.  Another trigger drink: regular coffee.  Keep it to decaf.
  7. Season lightly. This is individual, but some known irritants are things like chili peppers, tabasco, and hot sauces like salsa. They may not like you as much as you like them.
  8. Pass on deep-frying your turkey. I’d add, “and anything else.”  Fried foods trigger GERD symptoms in many folks, so be warned.  If you must eat them, think “taste” or a bite instead of a portion.
  9. Use smaller plates. It’s amazing how well this works.  If you’re int the habit of having seconds, try using a salad plate.  Then a second helping doesn’t have to mean overeating.
  10. Trade the soda for water. Bubbly stuff creates gas.  Gas puts upward pressure on that sphincter again and risks blowing acidic stomach contents into the esophagus. 
  11. Watch the desserts. Two reasons: 1) They’re heavy, just at the time your stomach is probably already full.  2) They’re usually really fatty (pie crust especially, but cake as well).  Best bet? Eat the filling in a small portion of pumpkin pie.  Hold the whipped cream and the a-la-mode.
  12. Skip the after-dinner mint. Peppermint oil – the flavoring – isn’t a “spice” but it’s just as irritating to the stomach and the esophagus.  It’s NOT a “digestive”. 
  13. SLOW DOWN! Make that salad plate-sized portion last at least 20 minutes – the amount of time it takes for your brain to register fullness, so don’t get there before the brain does!  Then ask yourself if you even want any more.  And remember, this is a time to get social.  Try and say something to everyone at the table.
  14. Stay awake. And upright.  People can feel comatose after a big meal (another reason to eat less).  Laying down after eating just makes it easier for stomach contents to back its way up into your esophagus and give you GERD symptoms.  Empty stomachs are better sleep companions.
  15. Talk to your doctor. Get relief!  There are medications available if you suffer from GERD symptoms frequently. 

Above all, may you enjoy the day, remember to be thankful.  My very best to you and your family.

Learn From a Baby About New Year’s Resolutions

Even a baby who hasn’t seen his/her first New Year can teach us something about making resolutions.  Babies may not think about their health, but this poll done in the UK found the top 3 resolutions for adults:

  1. Lose weight
  2. Get fitter
  3. Eat more healthy

Wisely, the poll also followed up with these people.  Nearly two out of three who made resolutions keep them and more than 4 in 10 broke a resolution within the first month.  Only 1 in 3 kept going for more than a month. 

Resolutions: They’re FOR the Year, so TAKE All Year

Imagine if a baby stopped trying to walk after falling?  Every single human would be immobile.  A broken resolution isn’t a failed resolution!  I wouldn’t even call it broken – just “in progress.”  The flip side is to expect 100% perfection 100% of the time, right from the start.  Ridiculous.  You get up, look at where you tripped up, and move on. 

This study found successful “resolvers” used more behavioral strategies, which, by nature, require more time, because behaviors change slowly.  Every road has a pothole or two, so if you encounter one on your journey, you’re typical and on schedule.  Keep it moving.

Ready, S.M.A.R.T., Go!  –Anytime

Learn from these guys

Never mind January 1, whenever you’re ready, the calendar will support it.  Just see a resolution as its own project.  Give it priority and treaty it with some respect.  This is you, after all.

S.M.A.R.T. is just an acronym for the components of successful goals and objectives, whether in the workplace or your personal space.   The letters have stood for different things over the years, but here’s where they stand now:

  • Specific: keep it simple, something you KNOW you can achieve. “I’m going to eat healthier” isn’t specific.  “I’m going to eat 1 cup of fruit and a cup of vegetables at least 3 days a week” is more specific.
  • Measurable: Note how far you walked, how many vegetables you ate, or whatever your specific objective is. Forget obsessing about every detail.  Again, simple is key here.
  • Achievable: Specific and achievable are two sides of the same coin.  THINK LIKE A BABY here.  Take baby steps!  Set a goal you think is achievable and then reduce the goal by 50% or more.    You can inch up later. 
  • Realistic: Meet yourself where you live.  If you can’t spare a whole hour a day for exercise – or if you’re not in shape yet for that – it’s OK.  I don’t care if you start walking for 5 minutes a day.  You’ll be at this the whole year and you’ll get where you need to go.  An easy goal is the best kind when you’re starting out. If you want to lose 10 pounds of body fat in 3 days, that’s specific but not realistic. 
  • Time-bound: TAKE THE WHOLE YEAR but set small time goals for the baby steps.  You’re building a habit here, and habits take time to become established. 

We want everything done immediately and easily sustained forever.  Let that concept go, because it’ll never happen – for anyone.  Most importantly, THAT’S OK. 

Baby steps & persistence!

Babies Have Vitamin “P”

Back to babies.  They’re loaded with vitamin P – persistence and patience!  Even better – they LOVE the journey and what they accomplish along the way!  Have you ever seen a baby’s expression when they crawl farther, learn to hold a spoon, or stand for the first time?   Give yourself a little credit for taking those baby steps.  They’re the best kind!