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Like Diversity? So Does Your Gut: FOUR Eating Styles to Help Out

I can’t count the times people have said to me, “this is the way everyone should be eating.” RIDICULOUS. The world is round. And there IS more than one eating style that’s good for your health.

This study looked at four eating styles known for their healthfulness: 

• The Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI 2010), is based on the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines for Americans. It focuses on fruits, veggies, legumes, whole grains, low-fat dairy foods and lean meats and other proteins.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is MED-diet-ideal.jpg
“Alternative” Mediterranean diet:
Less credit for red & processed meat

• The Alternative Healthy Eating Index (aHEI), based on HEI-2010 but de-emphasizes meat and dairy foods.

• The Alternative Mediterranean Diet (aMED) focuses specifically on markers of inflammation and cardiovascular health. Its score does not consider dairy intake or potatoes and gives credit for less consumption of red and processed meats.

• Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH diet), developed to reduce hypertension with diet, it encourages plenty of fruits, vegetables and low-fat/fat-free dairy foods but nothing is excluded.

The researchers wanted to compare each eating style’s impact on the gut and the diversity of healthy gut bacteria.

Drum Roll…The Results Showed…

If you REALLY build it,
the good gut bugs will come

ALL four eating styles benefitted the gut – and in mostly similar ways The authors found the results showed “strikingly consistent patterns.”  People with higher scores on all four eating styles had less “bad” bacteria – the ones associated with inflammatory diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, even colon cancer. 

Interestingly, the HEI-2010 – the more moderate of the eating styles studied and the one based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, was the only one of the four eating styles associated with lower amounts of harmful Escherichia-Shigella and Enterobacter, two species associated with diet-related conditions linked to systemic inflammation.

Higher scores on all the eating indices were also associated with a greater richness of beneficial fiber-fermenting bacteria in the gut.

For gut-geeks like myself, this study is incredibly interesting.  To consumers and “normal” people, here’s what it really means:

  • A healthy diet rules.  But not a single healthy diet.
  • There are at least four ways up the mountain to a healthy eating style.
  • It’s more about what you include than what you exclude!  Fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains help grow the most beneficial bacteria, because they’re loaded with fermentable fiber. 

Why I like this study

  • It looks at diverse eating styles and their impact on gut diversity.  That is, how these eating styles positively or negatively impact our gut bacteria. 
  • The study used subjects with diverse ethnicities: Japanese American, Latino, Native Hawaiian, and African American, who were part of the Multiethnic Cohort Study
  • These were also senior citizens, average age: 69 years.

The study was long: subjects were enrolled between 1993-1996 and their gut bacteria were studied as of 2013-2015.

Study Weaknesses: 

All studies have limitations, but this one has fewer than most. Most observational studies like this look only at initial dietary intake and then analyze outcomes a decade or more later, not knowing if diets changed during the interim.  This study took dietary intake at the enrollment and also during a return visit in 2013-2015, at which time the subjecfts also provided a stool sample.

Cut-To-The-Chase Recommendations

The least “restrictive” of these four eating styles is a split between DASH and the regular HEI.  They don’t exclude anything, emphasize balance and are probably the easiest to follow. Best of all, they produce good gut health. 

Learn From a Baby About New Year’s Resolutions

Even a baby who hasn’t seen his/her first New Year can teach us something about making resolutions.  Babies may not think about their health, but this poll done in the UK found the top 3 resolutions for adults:

  1. Lose weight
  2. Get fitter
  3. Eat more healthy

Wisely, the poll also followed up with these people.  Nearly two out of three who made resolutions keep them and more than 4 in 10 broke a resolution within the first month.  Only 1 in 3 kept going for more than a month. 

Resolutions: They’re FOR the Year, so TAKE All Year

Imagine if a baby stopped trying to walk after falling?  Every single human would be immobile.  A broken resolution isn’t a failed resolution!  I wouldn’t even call it broken – just “in progress.”  The flip side is to expect 100% perfection 100% of the time, right from the start.  Ridiculous.  You get up, look at where you tripped up, and move on. 

This study found successful “resolvers” used more behavioral strategies, which, by nature, require more time, because behaviors change slowly.  Every road has a pothole or two, so if you encounter one on your journey, you’re typical and on schedule.  Keep it moving.

Ready, S.M.A.R.T., Go!  –Anytime

Learn from these guys

Never mind January 1, whenever you’re ready, the calendar will support it.  Just see a resolution as its own project.  Give it priority and treaty it with some respect.  This is you, after all.

S.M.A.R.T. is just an acronym for the components of successful goals and objectives, whether in the workplace or your personal space.   The letters have stood for different things over the years, but here’s where they stand now:

  • Specific: keep it simple, something you KNOW you can achieve. “I’m going to eat healthier” isn’t specific.  “I’m going to eat 1 cup of fruit and a cup of vegetables at least 3 days a week” is more specific.
  • Measurable: Note how far you walked, how many vegetables you ate, or whatever your specific objective is. Forget obsessing about every detail.  Again, simple is key here.
  • Achievable: Specific and achievable are two sides of the same coin.  THINK LIKE A BABY here.  Take baby steps!  Set a goal you think is achievable and then reduce the goal by 50% or more.    You can inch up later. 
  • Realistic: Meet yourself where you live.  If you can’t spare a whole hour a day for exercise – or if you’re not in shape yet for that – it’s OK.  I don’t care if you start walking for 5 minutes a day.  You’ll be at this the whole year and you’ll get where you need to go.  An easy goal is the best kind when you’re starting out. If you want to lose 10 pounds of body fat in 3 days, that’s specific but not realistic. 
  • Time-bound: TAKE THE WHOLE YEAR but set small time goals for the baby steps.  You’re building a habit here, and habits take time to become established. 

We want everything done immediately and easily sustained forever.  Let that concept go, because it’ll never happen – for anyone.  Most importantly, THAT’S OK. 

Baby steps & persistence!

Babies Have Vitamin “P”

Back to babies.  They’re loaded with vitamin P – persistence and patience!  Even better – they LOVE the journey and what they accomplish along the way!  Have you ever seen a baby’s expression when they crawl farther, learn to hold a spoon, or stand for the first time?   Give yourself a little credit for taking those baby steps.  They’re the best kind!