CDC Report On Physical Activity: Some Good News (& Some Bad)

The good news?  We’re actually moving more!  This recent report from the CDC found that 23% of Americans are meeting physical activity recommendations established back in 2008. That’s even better than the goal set by Healthy People 2020 to have at least 1 in 5 Americans be “physically active”. We’ve exceeded the goal of 20% two years early, and since the CDC report is based on 2010-2015 data, probably even more Americans are active now.

The Bad News

If 23% are active, that means more than 3 in 4 Americans are sedentary. Even in Colorado, the most active state, only 1 in 3 adults met the activity guidelines, so 2 in 3 did not. A few other notables from the report:

• Women were less active than men in almost every state. Fewer than one in five (18.7%) women met the activity guidelines, but more than one in four men (27.2%) did.

• Working matters. If you’re unemployed, you’re less likely to be active. Nearly 29% of working men met the activity guidelines, for instance, but only 21% of non-working men did. Among working women, almost 21% met the guidelines, but only 14.6% of non-working women did. (Physical impairment to activity was not assessed.)

The Real Goal: We ALL need to be active

It’s easier than you think. Let’s be clear: you don’t have to join a gym, play a team sport, or be a competitive athlete. Please, I grew up totally incompetent at every sport that involved a ball. It’s about being more fit and staying fit, regardless of your age and weight, and there are many ways to get there.

Yes, your physical health will benefit, but the mood improvements may be even more motivating. Exercise gives you a mental lift, owing to the endorphins produced with moderate exercise. You don’t have to be a runner to get a “runner’s high”.

What constitutes being “physically active”?

The fed’s 2008 guidelines defined being “physically active” as follows:

• 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity AND

• Doing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice weekly.

What’s “moderate intensity” activity?

• Brisk walking is a perfect example of moderate intensity. Brisk walking of moderate intensity was found in this review to be about 100 steps per minute. Easy enough for anyone to measure. (Tip: kids love using the stopwatch on their phones for tracking stuff like this!)

• Try the “talk-sing” test. If you can talk during the activity, it’s probably moderate intensity. If you can sing, it’s pretty light. That’s your sign to pick up the pace.

The Cut-To-The-Chase-Nutrition Philosophy: 

JUST DO WHAT YOU CAN  DO

That 150 minutes a week (30-minutes a day for five days) may sound daunting, so break it up into 10-minute parcels. The best time to be active? When you WILL be active. No obsessions needed her, just move as often as you can, whenever you’re able.

Do it during your lunch hour for 10 minutes, then have lunch. Work up to a 30-minute walk on your lunch hour, then enjoy a healthy meal. Walking is the easiest and simplest, but it’s also effective.

Check with your doctor to make sure your body is ready to match your motivation. Safety first: don’t be a “weekend warrior” and do the whole 150 minutes in one day.

I always advocate being more active because I think I’m lucky to have the ability to do so. I’ve worked with people with physical disabilities for decades. They’d give anything to be active. I’m not wasting my physical abilities – and I still can’t catch a ball. Start SOMEWHERE, but start now, 10 minutes at a time.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *