YES! KIDS WHO EAT BREAKFAST DO BETTER IN SCHOOL

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You’ve heard it forever: “breakfast is the most important meal of the day.”  Sounds exactly like something you’d hear from picture-perfect TV moms like June Cleaver on “Leave It To Beaver, or Mrs. Cunningham on “Happy Days.”

Well, it’s really true, according to the latest research – and a lot of studies that preceded it.  This study involved 698 students, average age was about 7½ years, so primary grade school kids.  Just before they were given a standard achievement test, they completed a recall of what they’d eaten for breakfast.

The kids who ate breakfast before taking the test scored significantly higher than those who had not eaten breakfast.  One review looked at breakfast eaters among urban minority youth and the conclusions were horrifying:

  • The prevalence of skipping breakfast was “highly and disproportionately prevalent among urban minority children.”
  • Breakfast skipping negatively impacted academic achievement.
  • Was associated with increased absenteeism.
  • Despite the availability of school breakfast programs, not enough vulnerable children take advantage of them.

But What KIND of Breakfast Works?

berries-1851148_1280glass-of-milk-being-pouredwhole-grain-cereal-bowl-with-spoonBreakfast is a true opportunity for filling the gaps in kids’ diets that probably won’t be filled if they skip breakfast.  Here are the food groups of particular concern that most kids’ (and adults’) diets are lacking:

  • Low-fat/fat free dairy,
  • Fruits & vegetables,
  • Whole grains.

Breakfast is an ideal meal for getting all three of the food groups of concern. A simple serving of whole grain cereal, milk, and fruit covers so much nutritional ground.  These are foods they need multiple times during the day, and when kids miss breakfast, they don’t eat more of them later to compensate, they just miss out.  When they make a habit of skipping breakfast, it’s a lifestyle with a nutritional concern.

The US Dietary Guidelines for Americans points out 4 “nutrients of concern” so named because over half the population is falling short:

  • Calcium
  • Vitamin D
  • Potassium
  • Fiber

Indeed, at least 60% of kids (up to 90% of teen girls) don’t get enough calcium, yet a simple glass of milk – real milk, not a “milk alternative” – is a top source of three of those 4 nutrients of concern: calcium, potassium, and vitamin D.  The fresh fruit and whole grain cereal both have fiber, so you can see how that simple bowl of cereal, fruit and milk adds up to so much.  And kids like it!  Of course, for older kids, you can do some add-ons, too.  milk-ricotta-cheese-on-breadAdding some yogurt (Greek yogurt, too) or an egg, or some string cheese, just ups the protein and nutrition further, keeping them full and better able to focus until lunchtime.

Doing School Breakfast Smarter

The above review also called for a universal breakfast program that allows kids to actually have their breakfast in their own classrooms.  This is becoming more popular but it’s still in its early stages and needs to be greatly expanded because it has to be one of the best ideas yet about how to give kids breakfast at school and ensure they have it every day.  Here’s how it works:

  • Kids pick up their breakfast in a package as they enter their classroom.
  • They eat at their seat during the first 10 minutes or so of the school day, while announcements are made.
  • Remaining trash is collected, the kids continue with class, ready to learn.

I like this idea for a few reasons:

  • It always includes milk & fruit – two groups kids need more of.
  • Kids get a structured meal that’s balanced and meets federal nutrition standards.
  • They eat with their friends in a familiar place.
  • They get nourished when they need to concentrate.
  • Convenience! No having to go to the cafeteria, just go to class and it’s there.

The best part of breakfast in the classroom is that eating breakfast becomes part of their regular routine.  Breakfast is a meal of habit, and a good habit is one they can keep forever.

This column was supported by the Milk Processor Education Program

ARE YOU & YOUR KIDS “BACKLOADING” PROTEIN?

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You’ve heard about protein, you know it’s important for building muscle, and you know meat, poultry and fish have a lot of it.

No worries about getting enough protein, either, at least here in the US. But according to research by the US government, we tend to “backload” our protein – meaning we get most of it at dinner. Their stats show that dinner gives us nearly 60% of our daily protein. Breakfast is arguably the most important meal of the day, yet it brings us only about 13% of our protein.

We may be getting enough protein, but do we get it EARLY ENOUGH in the day?

“FRONTLOADING” protein

WHEN you eat protein is important. Kids (and adults) eat most of their protein and calories from after school on, but they NEED most of it earlier, when the demands of their day are greatest, starting at breakfast. Sadly, up to 40% of kids don’t even eat breakfast daily.

Load ‘em up with breakfast protein and they’ll work and feel better all day.­ It’s true. They’ll also be more focused at school and research has shown they also tend to eat less during the rest of the day. Anecdotally, in my practice, I’ve noticed that breakfast-skippers who start eating a good, high-protein breakfast also seem to be less tired after school, allowing them to be more active. It does makes sense, because without breakfast, they run out of energy. Kids shouldn’t want a nap after school, they should want to play, and protein-packed breakfast helps them do just that.

But what KIND of protein?

Meat has good protein but dairy and eggs actually have the highest quality protein, for most efficient use by your body. Most kids would especially benefit from more dairy. Why? The vast majority of kids (and adults!) also don’t get enough calcium, potassium, or vitamin D, and a simple glass of milk is like a cargo truck of these nutrients, and 6 other essential ones as well, so it covers a lot of ground, nutritionally. And, kids LIKE it.

yogurt-smoothieYou might think cereal and milk takes care of the protein at breakfast. For young kids, maybe. But for older kids, especially teens, that’s only about 10 grams of protein. Aim for 20-30 grams and they’ll stay full until lunch. Here are some options and their protein amounts, to help get them to that 20 grams. Combine them as you like:

  • Glass of milk (any percentage of fat, white or flavored): 8 grams (some brands have 9 or 10 grams)
  • Greek yogurt, flavored (a 5.3-oz cup): 12 grams
  • String cheese (2 oz. portion): 12 grams
  • 1 egg, any style: 6 grams
  • 1 oz. cheese (cheddar, Swiss, etc.): 6 grams
  • Cottage cheese, ½ cup: 14 grams
  • Ricotta, low-fat, ¼ cup: 7 grams
  • Peanut butter, 2 Tablespoons: 7 grams (but also about 190 calories, so use wisely if kids are overweight)

Cottage and ricotta cheese for kids? Yes, and they’re perfect in smoothies, as is Greek yogurt.

Keep it COW

To be clear: I’m talking about real milk. The “milk alternatives” like almond, coconut, rice, and other “milk” have almost no protein or naturally occurring calcium. Milk is naturally loaded with good stuff.

Nice add-on: the milk you buy is probably locally produced. Most places in the US are within a few hours’ drive of a dairy farm, even if you live in a big city. Pour a glass and feel good about supporting your local diary people.

Just as nice: milk is one of the best protein buys today. Even at $4.00/gallon, it’s only 25 cents a glass.

Supported by the Milk Processor Education Program

A “Silver Lining” for Those Who Re-gain Lost Weight

regainShows like “The Biggest Loser” where all the contestants lose weight and the big challenge is to lose the most weight, get people all ginned up to see who will win the top spot.  These shows can even get people motivated to make some real dietary and lifestyle changes when they see how contestant’s bodies and mindsets change over the weeks of the TV season.

A recent New York Times article suggests that once the show is over and the smoke clears, some contestants find it a real challenge to keep that weight off.  You might be tempted to think that being overweight is truly a “never ending battle of the bulge”.  A  Not so!  There are plenty of successes!  And people get there a lot more easily, if perhaps more slowly, than the TV contestants.  

Here’s the silver lining: align your eating habits and lifestyle with those who have lost it and kept it off for years.  I talk about a registry of thousands of successes and how you can make gradual, positive changes to your diet, lifestyle, and attitude about food and bring the battle of the bulge to a timely and successful end.  Read more in my blog in  the Huffington Post here.