Your Headphones Won’t Mask the “Noise” In New Egg-Heart Disease Study

For years, all you heard about eggs was that they were “linked with” heart disease.  Keep consumption to a few eggs per week and dietary cholesterol to less than 300 mg. per day. Since one egg has about 185 mg of cholesterol, you really had to be careful how you spent those 300 mg. 

Then, research found saturated fat to be riskier for heart disease than dietary cholesterol, but the egg damage was done.  Finally, the 2015 US Dietary Guideline for Americans finally dropped it’s 300 mg/day cholesterol limit.   

Eureka!  Progress!  Eggs Are Back!

Give up omelets? Say it ain’t so!

Just when consumers were getting comfortable having an omelet again, here comes a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association that claims an “association” between egg consumption and heart disease.  At first glance, the study seems impressive:

  • They looked at 6 different populations or “cohorts”, covering a 17-year period, on average.
  • They calculated hazard ratios (HR) and absolute risk difference (ARD) for cardiovascular-related deaths and all-cause mortality.
  • They adjusted for “demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral factors.”

Here’s what they concluded

“Among US adults, higher consumption of dietary cholesterol or eggs was significantly associated with higher risk of incident CVD and all-cause mortality in a dose-response manner.”

They say that, for every 300 mg of cholesterol you eat, your chances of dying from heart disease in 17 years (assuming you’re over 50) are increased by about 17% and your chances of dying of anything at all are increased by about 18%.

But the average consumption of both eggs and dietary cholesterol was modest.  Even the cohort with the highest consumption of eggs ate only 0.42 eggs/day – less than 3 eggs per week!  Average dietary cholesterol intake was: 240 mg/day – well under the previously recommended 300 mg/day.

Turns out that, in this study, cholesterol become the issue, not eggs, but even when you just look at cholesterol, it’s important to hear the study’s “noise”.

The “Noise”, a.k.a. Weaknesses & Limitations 

It’s problems, plural, and the authors acknowledged some of them, but still felt entitled to make some strong conclusions (and I feel entitled to strongly disagree with them):

  • “Associations” and “linked-to” don’t CAUSE anything.  Anytime, and I mean ANYTIME you hear about a study that shows a food is “linked to” or “associated with” a disease or condition, it does NOT indicate the food CAUSES that condition, yet journalists often don’t get this concept.  These “Observational” studies are incapable of doing anything more than generating a hypothesis.
  • All the dietary data came from a SINGLE dietary report, and a self-report at that.  That’s like asking thousands of people about their diets on one day, and track how many die in 17 years.  Then draw conclusions about their deaths based on what they ate on that single day.  
  • Different dietary survey methods were used, so there was no uniformity of measurement.  To deal with that, the authors use a lot of statistical methods that “harmonize” the data and supposedly give you a better picture.  All methods still involved self-reports however.
  • Poorly surveying a large number of people doesn’t make data more reliable, no matter how you “harmonize” the data.  In this study, it still means 29,000 people were poorly surveyed.    
  • This study assumes a stable diet and lifestyle for 17 years, and that’s unrealistic.  No matter how many statistical tests you do, or how much “statistical significance” you find, no one – but no one – has that kind of stability for 17 years. 

Who knows what other lifestyle factors that evolved during the 17-years after the original dietary data were taken?  The authors do not, and the study cannot tell anything about what influence such factors might have had.

Yes, they’re STILL incredible…
….even for your heart!

Cut-To-The-Chase-Nutrition Reality Check

The egg has nourished people for thousands of years.  It has the highest quality protein of any food (it’s neck-and-neck with dairy), and critical, hard-to-get nutrients like vitamin D and choline.  Eggs also have the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, known to help reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration.  And they’re actually low in saturated fat. 

  • Pair your eggs with other good foods.  Scramble or fry them in olive oil, have them with fresh fruit and whole-grain toast.  It’s breakfast, but also lunch or dinner.
  • Balance it!  Greek yogurt with that fruit will round out the meal, or combine them in a smoothie as a beverage with those eggs.   
  • I keep hard-cooked eggs in my fridge as a high-protein snack.  Spread them with some Dijon mustard or hummus and keep hunger pangs away. 

The Easter bunny can rest easily.

Did Your Child Eat 90 Cups of Strawberries This Morning?

If that happened, then be concerned with pesticide residues.  Everyone else can forget about the Environmental Working Group’s annual “Dirty Dozen” list.  

I can always tell it’s spring — that’s when the EWG issues it’s list of fruits and veggies with pesticide residues, just when people are looking forward to spring and produce.  The EWG’s message is always the same:  Avoid the Dirty Dozen.  And the failures of their message are also the same:


AGAIN, the EWG fails to put pesticide use into context and AGAIN, that’s irresponsible. (Example: even a child would have to eat 181 servings (about 90 cups) of strawberries, the #1 food on Dirty Dozen list, to exceed safe levels. An adult male would need to eat 635 servings (about 317 cups) of strawberries. 

AGAIN, the EWG doesn’t mention the pesticides used in organic agriculture.  There are hundreds of them, and even a few dozen synthetic ones that are allowed under certain circumstances – while still allowing the food to carry an “organic” label.

AGAIN, consumers should be reminded that the feds have been looking at this for decades, through its Pesticide Data Program.

The “Villains”

Kale: The new addition to the “Dirty Dozen”
  1. Strawberries
  2. Spinach
  3. Kale
  4. Nectarines
  5. Apples
  6. Grapes
  7. Peaches
  8. Cherries
  9. Pears
  10. Tomatoes
  11. Celery
  12. Potatoes

It Really Is ALL Good

You’ve heard that “the dose makes the poison.”  It’s true, but the dose also brings the benefit.  Let’s remember: ALL the research proving the healthfulness of eating plenty of fruits and vegetables – fresh, canned, frozen, dried – throughout our lives, was done using CONVENTIONALLY grown produce, not organic. 

Organic is just another choice.  If buying organic gets you eating more fruits and vegetables, then terrific!  But if you can’t find them, can’t afford them, or simply want to eat healthful food that’s also more economical, then the conventionally-grown option is fine.  I eat organic produce sometimes, when it’s convenient and reasonably priced.  I also eat ALL the conventionally-grown produce on the “dirty” list. 

No, I Won’t Peel My Apples

Eat the peels! There’s good stuff there!

That may remove pesticide residues but it’s probably healthier to eat the edible peels and skins on produce – they’re loaded with antioxidants and prebiotic fiber.  The research supporting eating fiber outweighs the near-non-existent negative research on pesticides on our food.  It’s also a huge waste to throw away these edible portions.


My EdibleRx about LAST YEAR’s Dirty Dozen holds as true today as it did then, except that kale made this year’s list, bumping off sweet bell peppers. Yawn.  If you hate kale, you’re thrilled.  But if you like it, then it won’t kale you to keep eating it without concern.  

Still Have Doubts?

Get the facts.  This cool tool calculates how many servings of one of the Dirty Dozen a man, woman or child would have to eat before pesticides could become a concern.  It’s from the Alliance for Food and Farming – a non-profit organization of BOTH organic and conventional growers of fruits and vegetables on all sizes of farms.

Organic: The Answer To Cancer Prevention?

If anyone tells you they have the definitive answer, they’re misleading you.

Growing foods conventionally usually – but not always – involves the use of some pesticides when there’s a need to control harmful bugs, plant viruses, fungi, etc. that damage either the whole plant or the edible portion of it.  These compounds are expensive, so farmers tend not to use them unless absolutely necessary, and then in the least amount possible for the needed benefit. 

Organic crops are thought to be grown without pesticides, but there are hundreds of pesticides approved for use on organic crops.  Most are organic ones, but in certain circumstances, as with a particularly difficult to control pest, USDA has rules in place to allow limited use of a few dozen synthetic pesticides is allowed, and the food produced can still be labeled “organic”. 

But Is Organic Food Healthier?

Twice the price,
but twice the benefit?

“Healthier” has no formal definition, but let’s say it means you have a lower risk of developing cancer, since that’s a highly desirable outcome by everyone.  Would eating organic food make you less likely to develop cancer?

This recent study wanted to find out.  It was a prospective study – meaning that it went on for years before results were determined.  As part of a large study involving 68,946 French participants, all volunteers “self-reported” the frequency of consumption of organic foods.  Responses about consumption were multiple choice and ranged from 1 (“most of the time”) to 7 (“never”), with an option for “I don’t know”.  Demographic information was also gathered, including about household income.  This was interesting, because the top household income bracket was US $3,100, hardly “upper income” even in 2009, when the study launched.

The Good News: Organic Eaters Had Less Cancer

More frequently eating organic foods was “associated” with lower your cancer risk.   Key word, “associated”.  It’s the bane of my existence because it is often interpreted as “cause-and-effect,” a very wrong assumption. 

Why?  This study was “observational”.  These types of studies aren’t designed to evaluate cause-and-effect.  They can only generate a hypothesis that clinical studies could then evaluate for more direct conclusions.  This study is incapable of making such conclusions.

Photo: www.inkmedia.eu

The not-so-good news: the benefit of eating organic was minimal, at best.  The risk of getting cancer went down only 0.6% — that’s 6/10ths of one percent, and only for the most frequent eaters of organic food.  Even then, the benefit may be less than reported. Read on… 

Limitations of the Study, A.K.A. the “Fine Print”

The authors responsibly called out a fairly lengthy list of limitations of this study, and why the results need to be seen with caution:

  1. The participants were volunteers who were “likely particularly health conscious individuals”, therefore limiting the application of the results to the general public.
  2. The questionnaire used asked about frequency of consumption but not quantity.    Also, possible misclassification of organic foods, “cannot be excluded.”
  3. Follow-up time was short – an average of only about 4½ years.  Cancer can take many years to develop and it’s unclear what the diets of these participants were prior to participation.
  4. Possible “residual confounding resulting from unmeasured factors or inaccuracy in the assessment of some covariates cannot be totally excluded.”  This means there is a lot they didn’t measure or that they couldn’t measure accurately. 
  5. They could not exclude the non-detection of some cancers. 

Cut-To-The-Chase-Nutrition Takeaways

  • Will eating organic food help prevent cancer? Not based on this study.
  • Organic food is expensive, and thus out of reach of many, even if they can find it.
  • Organic doesn’t mean pesticide-free. 
  • Focus on this: A mountain of research showing the health benefits (including cancer risk reduction) of eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains, was done using conventional foods! 

Got the Blues? Try Onions & Grapefruit!

OK, onions and grapefruit together isn’t appetizing, but eating more high-fiber foods like these, and maybe some butter, might help, according to new research.

You’ve heard for ages that diets high in fiber can reduce your risk for stroke, hearty disease, cancer, hypertension, and all sorts of chronic health problems.  In addition to all the above benefits, mounting evidence is telling us that a high fiber diet can improve brain health. 

This recent review looked at a wide body of research and concluded that compounds produced by healthy gut bacteria, especially a compound called butyric acid, may positively impact our brains.  Some of the research they reviewed involved only rats, but much of it looked at the impact of high-fiber diets on human behavior, and they found a reduction of anxiety and an improved ability to focus and multitask when there were more healthy bacteria present in the gut. 

An even more recent study that analyzed human gut bacteria found that people reporting a low quality of life and/or depression had different bacteria in their colon than people who had normal mental health and were happier.  The bacteria don’t impact our mental health directly, because they stay in the colon, but the compounds they produce do make it into the circulation and appear to positively impact our brain health.

Fiber: Why eat it if we can’t digest it? 

Fiber: you can’t digest it & you probably need more of it

When we eat, we’re not just feeding ourselves, we’re also feeding the bacteria in our colons, and high-fiber foods like oat and wheat bran, beans, and pretty much most fruits and veggies, promotes the growth of good bacteria.  That’s what makes high-fiber foods PRE-biotic. 

Undigested fiber sails past the small intestine, landing in our colon, where beneficial bacteria see fiber as an all-you-can-eat buffet.  When they’re through with it, they’ve produced beneficial by-products called short-chain fatty acids.  The three main ones are:

  • Acetic acid (think vinegar),
  • Propionic acid, and
  • Butyric acid (also called butyrate).

Butyric acid is getting attention because of its diverse biological functions in our bodies outside of the colon.  A lot of the benefits noted in the studies above have been attributed to butyrate, to the point that its potential health impact shouldn’t be ignored. 

3-4% of butter is butyric acid,
but better sources abound

You CAN Believe It’s Butter

High fiber foods aren’t the only way to increase the butyric acid in your colon.  There are some naturally-occurring sources of butyrate, such as probiotic foods like yogurt and kefir, that can increase strains of bacteria that produce butyrate. 

One of the largest single natural sources of butyrate is butter.  It’s true – butter contains about 4% butyric acid.  I’m not advocating eating more butter, and there are better ways to help get butyric acid into the gut.  Including fermented dairy foods, however, is definitely worthwhile for so many nutritional reasons.

The Fine Print

Ironically, people with irritable bowel and other gastrointestinal conditions are often advised to be on a “low-FODMAP” diet that eliminates many high-fiber foods that good bacteria use to produce butyric acid.  No worries – there are still lots of fruits and vegetables you can eat.  Stick to your prescribed diet and as your condition improves, just add FODMAP foods back into your diet as advised.  Kate Scarlata, RDN, is an outstanding registered dietitian who specializes in the FODMAP diet has tons of info on her website.   

Cut-to-the-Chase Conclusions

The point here is that the gut does communicate with the brain in very specific ways, and these may be influenced by the type and amounts of various strains of bacteria – both good ones and negative ones. Most people only get about 12-14 grams of fiber daily, and we should be eating twice that amount, according to US Dietary Guidelines.

Aim to gradually eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads and cereals, and beans (these are loaded with great fiber!). As for fresh vs. frozen, vs. canned, no need to get too obsessive. Just eat more of these foods overall. Me? I never peel apples, carrots or potatoes. I’m not tossing away good fiber!

While nothing is a guarantee of good mental health, optimizing our gut environment is likely to also optimize our gut’s ability to send good messages to the brain.  It may not cure depression but even if it doesn’t change our perceived quality of life, it’s very likely to lay down a good foundation for the gut to operate at its full potential. A higher fiber diet is good for our gut — and good for the rest of our body as well. #winwin

I’ll take that.     

Wanna Eat Healthy? Get Your Nitrates!

Think nitrates in your food and eating healthy don’t go together? What’s this gorgeous spinach salad have to do with nitrates? Read on, but let’s start at the beginning.

You’re not going vegan but you want to eat better and you’ll start with baby steps, like I talked about in my previous post.  OK, and here are some popular intentions:

  • Try and eat more leafy green stuff.
  • Definitely cut the hot dogs, ham, bacon, the deli stuff, and “processed” meat, even if it’s lean.  Everyone knows that stuff is “bad” because it has nitrates, right?

Swapping out hot dogs and ham for spinach and beets (the new “in” veggie for 2019, as I mentioned here) would at least cut back on the nitrates, right?  Wrong. 

Where the Real Nitrates Are

Indeed, a bunch of healthy, nutrient-rich veggies like beets, spinach, celery, even iceberg lettuce and broccoli, have more nitrates than that hot dog you snuck in for lunch last week.  Check out this chart from a 2012 report of the nitrate content in foods.  Amounts are in “parts per million” (ppm):

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is mushrooms-417101_1280-2.jpg
More nitrates than a hot dog — & it’s healthy food!
  • Beets: 2797 ppm
  • Spinach: 2333 ppm
  • Celery: 1496
  • Mushrooms: 590 ppm
  • Broccoli: 394 ppm
  • Strawberries: 173 ppm
  • Cured sausage (hot dog), cooked: 32 ppm

Are Nitrates in Fruits and Veggies a Problem?

No, and not in other foods either, according to Melissa Joy Dobbins MS, RDN, CDE and known as The Guilt-Free® RD.   “This is a great example of how misinformation can create a “fear factor” when it comes to food. I think most people who are concerned about nitrates/nitrites would be surprised to learn that the majority of these nutrients in our diet are not from cured meats, but from plant foods, namely a variety of vegetables.”

Dobbins’ statement is evidence-based and reflects the conclusion of this 2015 meta-analysis of many studies on dietary nitrates, nitrites, and nitrosamines, which found nitrates associated with a decreased risk of gastric cancer.  The slight increased risk associated with increased nitrite intake was considered weak, and tended to come from weak or poorly-designed studies, which muddied their findings.  Even then, spinach still has more nitrites than cured sausage.

Nitrates & Their Cousins: Nitrites and Nitrosamines

Here are the basics you need to know about these:

  • Nitrates are naturally present in lots of different foods. 
  • Nitrites are also naturally present in foods but most are formed when bacteria in your saliva convert nitrates to nitrites. 
  • Nitrosamines are not naturally present in food but can form in food through several pathways.  Cooking at a high temperature, such as frying cured meat, or when an acid (like stomach acid) is present.  If there’s any concern, it’s with the formation of nitrosamines.  Even then, conversion from nitrite to nitrosamine can be inhibited or stopped by the addition of compounds like ascorbic acid, or “vitamin C”.  Seriously – check the ingredient label of many cured foods like hot dogs and you’ll find “ascorbic acid” is often present. 

“Nitrate-Free” Cured Meat?

There are cured meats labeled “no added nitrates.”  What they add instead is celery powder.  As you’ll see from the table above, celery is loaded with natural nitrate.  There’s no evidence that there’s any difference between the nitrate in celery powder and the nitrate added to “nitrated” cured meat. 

Celery: Fine wherever you find it

Nitrates: The Boil-Down

It’s ironic to know that someone eating a spinach salad is probably getting 10 times more nitrates than the person eating the ham sandwich, but Dobbins noted, “Does that mean we should be afraid of eating vegetables? No. It means we should look at the overall nutrients a food provides and try to consume more nutrient-rich foods and fewer empty-calorie foods.”

It may be that the folks who eat lots of cured meat may also have a less-healthy lifestyle overall.  They may be less likely to engage in regular physical activity, and less likely to eat a lot of veggies and fruits, and may drink more soda or eat more junk snacks.

Cut-To-The-Chase-Advice

Eat all the spinach, beets, mushrooms, celery and broccoli you can fit into your diet.  As for cured meat, I like Dobbins’ approach. Nitrates may not be an issue but balance still is, so don’t go crazy at a cold-cut buffet.  If you like cured meats, make them leaner cuts, like ham, instead of sausage.  And have that ham with lots of veggies – even high-nitrate ones like spinach and broccoli.  A meal loaded with nitrates can, and should, still be healthy.  0000000000000

Learn From a Baby About New Year’s Resolutions

Even a baby who hasn’t seen his/her first New Year can teach us something about making resolutions.  Babies may not think about their health, but this poll done in the UK found the top 3 resolutions for adults:

  1. Lose weight
  2. Get fitter
  3. Eat more healthy

Wisely, the poll also followed up with these people.  Nearly two out of three who made resolutions keep them and more than 4 in 10 broke a resolution within the first month.  Only 1 in 3 kept going for more than a month. 

Resolutions: They’re FOR the Year, so TAKE All Year

Imagine if a baby stopped trying to walk after falling?  Every single human would be immobile.  A broken resolution isn’t a failed resolution!  I wouldn’t even call it broken – just “in progress.”  The flip side is to expect 100% perfection 100% of the time, right from the start.  Ridiculous.  You get up, look at where you tripped up, and move on. 

This study found successful “resolvers” used more behavioral strategies, which, by nature, require more time, because behaviors change slowly.  Every road has a pothole or two, so if you encounter one on your journey, you’re typical and on schedule.  Keep it moving.

Ready, S.M.A.R.T., Go!  –Anytime

Learn from these guys

Never mind January 1, whenever you’re ready, the calendar will support it.  Just see a resolution as its own project.  Give it priority and treaty it with some respect.  This is you, after all.

S.M.A.R.T. is just an acronym for the components of successful goals and objectives, whether in the workplace or your personal space.   The letters have stood for different things over the years, but here’s where they stand now:

  • Specific: keep it simple, something you KNOW you can achieve. “I’m going to eat healthier” isn’t specific.  “I’m going to eat 1 cup of fruit and a cup of vegetables at least 3 days a week” is more specific.
  • Measurable: Note how far you walked, how many vegetables you ate, or whatever your specific objective is. Forget obsessing about every detail.  Again, simple is key here.
  • Achievable: Specific and achievable are two sides of the same coin.  THINK LIKE A BABY here.  Take baby steps!  Set a goal you think is achievable and then reduce the goal by 50% or more.    You can inch up later. 
  • Realistic: Meet yourself where you live.  If you can’t spare a whole hour a day for exercise – or if you’re not in shape yet for that – it’s OK.  I don’t care if you start walking for 5 minutes a day.  You’ll be at this the whole year and you’ll get where you need to go.  An easy goal is the best kind when you’re starting out. If you want to lose 10 pounds of body fat in 3 days, that’s specific but not realistic. 
  • Time-bound: TAKE THE WHOLE YEAR but set small time goals for the baby steps.  You’re building a habit here, and habits take time to become established. 

We want everything done immediately and easily sustained forever.  Let that concept go, because it’ll never happen – for anyone.  Most importantly, THAT’S OK. 

Baby steps & persistence!

Babies Have Vitamin “P”

Back to babies.  They’re loaded with vitamin P – persistence and patience!  Even better – they LOVE the journey and what they accomplish along the way!  Have you ever seen a baby’s expression when they crawl farther, learn to hold a spoon, or stand for the first time?   Give yourself a little credit for taking those baby steps.  They’re the best kind!

Yes, Virginia: There Are 10 Ways to Have Holidays Without Weight Gain

So many people, clients, patients, co-workers over the years, have told me they’ve just given up trying to lose weight during the holidays – that food-festival parties, get-togethers, celebrations and general mayhem that spans the period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day.

What is about holidays that cause weight gain? If you know the contributing factors, you can make a plan. Here’s what you’re likely to deal with until New Years:

Workplace food court: The constant brigade of popcorn bins, chocolates, homemade cookies, cakes and sweets, all available all day long.

Drinking: We love eggnog, but it’s the most calorie-laden drink of any year – about 330 calories in a cup. Over-boozing has calories, too – and leads to mindless eating.

Stress-eating: time is short, obligations are long, stress triggers eating whatever is within arm’s reach!

More fooding, less moving: whenever you need a little more time to get things done, it’s easy to borrow from your workouts and walks. It’s also just when you need to burn some extra calories. Ow.

Happiness can be depressing! Everyone seems to be happy but you’re so-so. You’re not alone, either. It’s easy to think food is your BFF during the holidays, and it can be – if you choose the right friends.

Good News

You probably won’t gain much weight during the holidays! This review published last year found that average holiday weight gain in adults ranged from about 1-2 pounds in various studies, not the 5-7 pounds you may have heard about.
But what about you? If holiday weight gain has been YOUR typical, changing that is easier than you think. Take it on as a project and like every project, it needs a good plan. Plans may take some of the spontaneity out of eating, but you’re trading up – for peace of mind and body. That’s totally worth it.

Planning means that you start every day assessing the meals and eating occasions you’ll have and the foods you’re likely to encounter. What does the “no holiday weight gain” plan look like? Here are 10 strategies that put you on a path to enjoying holidays without weight gain:

1. Eat modestly, but don’t skip meals. You’ll just end up being hungry and over-scarfing.

2. Weave in some fiber: Aim for 3 pieces of fresh fruit daily. Aim for 2 cups of veggies, raw or cooked. Think you can’t?  You can – fill up one of those plastic take-out soup containers with cut veggies and it’s two cups right there.

3. Discriminate! Is it a regular store-bought something-or-other that’s loaded with empty calories or is it really tasty? Hold out for something really special. You’re worth it.

4. Never arrive hungry to a party:Eat some raw veggies or a piece of fruit before going to a party or social function. When the edge is off hunger, your focus is on social fun.

5. Go pro: Lean protein keeps you feeling satisfied, and helps prevent blood glucose levels from spiking then plummeting later. About 100-150 calories invested in options like turkey roll-ups, beef jerky, fat-free Greek yogurt, even a fat-free latte will pay off later.

6. Get functional: it’s a social function, so keep the priority on socializing rather than eating.

7. Be the last man (or woman) standing…in line: Always be among the last ones in line for the food. It’ll look a little less appetizing (probably a good thing) and there’s less time to have second portions.

8. Get out of Dodge: Lingering to the end encourages more nibbling.  Be social, sample what you want, then move along.

9. ONE – a singular sensation!  When you see something you want, have it. But one portion. One is the magic number, not a lonely number.  But read #10.

10. Get “hospital-sized”:  Not to eat, just to look at portion sizes. When you’re thinking of a high-calorie food, whether it’s mac and cheese or the Buche de Noel pictured at the top, it’s one “hospital-sized” portion. Keep it there and enjoy it. There will be another treat another day.

Why I Try To Be “Over 30” Every Day

Dee is an inspiration to me.  She has cerebral palsy and is confined to a motorized wheelchair. She has only minimal use of each hand, just enough to move her chair and use a phone if it’s placed into her hand. She’s not only cognitively intact, she’s pretty smart.

I’m lucky. I worked for 33 years with people with special needs, people like Dee.  It’s emotionally difficult work sometimes, but I always got more than I could ever give them. One powerful lesson they taught me was how lucky I was to be physically able-bodied.

She told me once she was fed up hearing what a nuisance people thought it was to take the stairs, walk the dog, or park farther away from your destination to get in a few extra steps. “They sit down all day long but they have a choice. I don’t. If I could walk I’d never want to sit down.”

When we think of chores, she thinks of abilities. Big wake-up call here.

Everyone Needs To Be Over 30

I speak not of years, but of minutes. Thirty minutes of physical activity for at least five days of the week is what’s recommended by the US Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. How much do we get? The feds survey this info regularly and the latest data show 1 in 4 of us get NO leisure physical activity at all. None. That’s self-reported data, and it may be higher, as people do tend to enhance the amount of physical activity they do.

Flipping the Script on Activity

Many of us cringe when we’re told to be more active. So how about baby steps? How about focusing on being less INACTIVE?

If it’s too overwhelming to go to a gym (I speak not of “joining” because that doesn’t ensure “going”) or if you have little leisure time, then it makes sense to build some activity into your day, a little bit here and there, whenever you can.

Enter the “Exercise Snack”

A food snack is something less than a meal. An exercise snack is something less than a workout. It can take many forms and be done pretty much anywhere. It doesn’t have a minimum time, it just requires moving – anyway you can, and anywhere you can. You don’t need to develop a twitch, just think of doing what some of my physically disabled patients would LOVE to do:

Deliver it.  Why email a memo to someone close by, when you can walk down the hall to speak with them? Follow-up with a memo for the record.

Think glass,  not bottle.  Have one glass of water at a time, rather than brining a bottle to your desk. When you want more, you’ll get up and get it.

DIY: Make a photocopy yourself, get the staples from the supply closet, give the home floor an extra quick vacuuming. It’ll get done your way and it’s another exercise snack.

TV? A 30-minute sitcom only has about 22-23 minutes of actual programming. That’s about 7 minutes of time – in 2 or 3-minute intervals – for exercise snacking.  Get the playing cards, charge your phone, lay out your clothes for the next day, or even fold a few clothes.

Tidy up!  Not a deep clean, just clear the coffee table, run the dishwasher, or hang that coat that’s been there since you got home.

Remember, these are exercise snacks, not workouts, so you’re done after a couple of minutes, but do them several times a day and you’re on your way top getting that 30 minutes. Better still, you’re preventing your metabolism from slowing down. Remember – it’s not about being more active – just less INACTIVE.

It’s an easier goal to achieve and these exercise snacks might lead to bigger things, like “exer-meals”. And if you need motivation, remember: Dee would happily trade places with you.

As for motivation, check this video out of a 4-year-old girl with cerebral palsy, taking her first steps by herself.  You’ll cheer her on as loudly as I did.  Then get up off your chair or the sofa — just because you can!

Holiday Eating: Everything in Moderation…Including Moderation!

Julia Child actually said that line, but I like it, and I LOVE Thanksgiving. It’s my favorite holiday, because it’s not about anything but having a meal with people you care about.

Thanksgiving is also often the year’s biggest – and the richest – meal for most people.  Think about it — even a standard Thanksgiving meal is rich, and “rich” is courteous foodie-speak for “loaded with fat and calories”:

• Turkey with plenty of gravy.

• Stuffing: nearly all recipes are rich with bread or rice and loaded with various fats.

• Potatoes (all colors): mashed, candied, marshmallowed, they get loads of butter and we love them.

• Vegetables and sides? They’re healthy, but on this day they come creamed, buttered, and casseroled, and serve as vehicles for calories, mostly fat ones.

• Desserts are a must. It’s not yes or no, but how many and how much of each?

Even if dessert is a must, weight gain doesn’t have to be.  Read on.

Deposit Some Calories in the Bank

If you’ve been going to the same place for the holidays or having the day at your place you know the basics of what will be served. You know it’ll be a big meal. That’s OK, but plan ahead for it and put “bank” some calories by undereating for a few days before the Big Meal with these tips:

Eat a lean, high-protein breakfast.  Swap the fried egg and bacon sandwich for a couple of hard-cooked eggs, whole grain toast, and fresh fruit. Or go for 8-10 oz. (that’s 1 or 2 of those individual cups) of fat-free Greek yogurt and berries.

Snacks? Keep them to fresh fruit or a small handful of nuts, or even some beef jerky (lots of protein there).

“Sensible” lunch and dinner?  That term always annoys me.  (Who eats a “nonsense” meal?) Here’s what it means: eat smart, eat mindfully, eat deliberately.  Keep added fats to a minimum, so skip anything deep-fried or that has gravy. Keep proteins lean (lean cuts of beef, chicken, fish), and load up on veggies – cooked or raw. Salads? Sure, but use a low-fat dressing or keep the oils to 1 tablespoon.

Desserts?  Let ’em wait for now, other than fresh fruit or fat-free Greek yogurt (I recommend that over regular yogurt because it’s higher in protein, to help you feel full and satisfied with fewer calories.)  Remember, you’re saving up for later.

Your Ace in the Hole

You’re busy, but make a 20-minute walk a priority each day. That’s another 100 or so calories you’ll “bank”. If you’re a gym-goer, this is not the time to slack off. Indeed, you’ll bust some stress in the process and give yourself a mood lift. No downside here.

Be thankful you CAN be active. Anyone physically disabled would tell us to shut up about being too busy to be active. To them, it would be the greatest gift possible. We already have it. Let’s be thankful and not waste the gift.

Do even a couple of these tips and you’ll likely save a few hundred calories each day that you can “spend” having a little more at the Big Meal. Net result: no weight gain!  Happy Day.  You’ve got this.

Family Meals: You Don’t Have To Go Big, Just Go Home

Eating together as a family – however you define your family – has always been a good thing, but now it’s been shown to be a healthier thing, too. This September marks the 4th National Family Meals Month ™, a campaign started in 2015 by the non-profit Food Marketing Institute Foundation to encourage families to eat together more often.

And The Survey Says…

Here’s what a Nielson Harris poll, conducted last year, found about the campaign’s impact among consumers who saw it:

• 4 in 10 (42%) said they were cooking more meals at home.

• More than 3 in 10 are:

    • Making healthier food choices
    • Eating more fruits and vegetables
    • Eating together more as a family

As a nutrition professional, these are big wins. But the bennies don’t stop there. Read on.

This publication from the University of Florida reviewed the benefits of family meals and found:

• Family meals are happening more often. Now 7 in 10 kids eat with their families at least four times a week.

• Family meals strengthen family bonds and teach an appreciation of cultural, ethnic, and religious heritage.

• Teens said that talking/catching up, and spending time with family members was the BEST PART of family meals. Huge win for families and a huge opportunity.

Something that’s better for nutritional, physical, and mental health, improves social behaviors, and contributes to a family’s overall feeling of happiness is as close to a “magic bullet” as you’re going to find. They’re certainly cheaper than eating out or getting take-out. Do they take a little time to prepare? Yes, but show me something, ANYTHING, that does a better job of helping you and your family be healthier and happier and save you money. There isn’t anything better for a family than a meal eaten together. Period.

So What Are the Barriers To More Family Meals?

Despite all these benefits from family meals, they aren’t happening often enough. The top obstacles cited in the FMI survey:

• Scheduling issues – everyone is in different places at meal times.

• Too tired to cook. Takeout or eating out seems easier.

• Too time-consuming to make meals.

• Too many distractions: social media, TV, homework.

But… What’s For Dinner?

Have you noticed that this nutritionist has mentioned very little about things like calories, fats, and added sugars in this post? I’m actually less interested in what you serve than the fact that you’re eating together.

Get the family meal ritual down first. The research has shown that once more family meals start happening, the quality of the meal starts advancing: more fruits and vegetables, fewer empty calories, less sugar and saturated fat. Eat together at home and you’re probably on your way to a better meal.

One rule though: No technology at the table. Each member has a place at the table because they matter. Yes, family meals can be part of esteem-building also

Getting Help: A Few Tips

• Delegate: Older kids an share some meal prep duties. It’s good for initiate communication without being “face-to-face”. Make sure to thank them for their help, too. It reinforces that they’re appreciated.

• Convenience if OK: Bagged greens, frozen veggies, and yes, canned foods like beans and tomato sauce are nutritious and save time. I encourage them.

• Set it up: before work, set the table, get out any pots or pans you’ll need, and anything non-perishable. It really shaves valuable time later.

Dinner IN 30 Minutes? Try Dinner FOR 30 Minutes

Eat more slowly, do more talking. The food won’t go away and you’ll enjoy it more. If the kids are done eating sooner, then have them stay for the full 30 minutes to make conversation. Make it a family tradition and try doing it as often as you can, because #FamilyMealsMonth matters, and it matters all year long.